African Statistical Yearbook

English, French
Frequency
Annual
ISSN: 
2411-9822 (online)
DOI: 
10.18356/57dc2605-en-fr
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The Yearbook series is a result of collaborative efforts by major African regional organizations to set up a joint data collection mechanism of socioeconomic data on African countries, as well as the development of a harmonized database. It seeks to promote wider use of country data, reduce costs, significantly improve the availability and quality of the data, and lead to better monitoring of development initiatives on the continent.
 
African Statistical Yearbook 2012

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English, French
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Author(s):
UN
21 Feb 2013
Pages:
352
ISBN:
9789210560276 (PDF)
DOI: 
10.18356/9b9acdb6-en-fr

Hide / Show Abstract

The Yearbook series is a result of collaborative efforts by major African regional organizations to set up a joint data collection mechanism of socioeconomic data on African countries, as well as the development of a harmonized database. It seeks to promote wider use of country data, reduce costs, significantly improve the availability and quality of the data, and lead to better monitoring of development initiatives on the continent. The data in this issue of the Yearbook are arranged generally for the years 2003-2011, or for the last eight years for which data are available. It is published in a single volume consisting of two parts: a set of summary tables followed by country profiles.

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  • Production team
    The 2012 African Statistical Yearbook was prepared under the overall umbrella of the African Statistical Coordination Committee set up by the principal continental organizations dealing with statistical development, namely the African Development Bank (AfDB), the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF), the African Union Commission (AUC), and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) within the framework of the implementation of the Reference Regional Strategic Framework for Statistical Capacity Building in Africa (RRSF).
  • Foreword
    The African Statistical Yearbook (ASYB) 2012 is the fourth edition jointly produced by the African Development Bank (AfDB), the African Union Commission (AUC), and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA). It is a result of the fruitful collaboration that exists among the three pan-African organizations within the field of statistics. This synergistic collaboration has two principal benefits: (1) it minimizes the risk of inconsistent information being produced by the three organizations, and (2) it reduces the reporting burden on member states, who might otherwise be obliged to submit data separately to each institution.
  • Introduction (English)
    The Yearbook series is a result of collaborative efforts by major African regional organizations to set up a joint data collection mechanism of socioeconomic data on African countries, as well as the development of a harmonized database. The African Statistical Yearbook aims to break with the practices of the past, where each regional/ subregional organization published their own statistical data on African countries. This led to duplication of efforts, inefficient use of scarce resources, an increased burden on member countries, and sometimes conflicting data for users. The joint collection and sharing of data among regional institutions seeks to promote wider use of country data, reduce costs, significantly improve the availability and quality of the data, and lead to better monitoring of development initiatives on the continent.
  • Abbreviations and acronyms
  • General notes
    The statistics presented in this Yearbook are, as far as possible, in accordance with international standards and definitions. Where important deviations are known to exist, they are indicated in footnotes at the end of each country’s table. Owing to the rounding of figures, the totals shown in tables do not always correspond exactly to the sum of their component items.
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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Summary tables

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    • Social and demographic indicators
      In 2010 an estimated 3.8 million children died in Africa before reaching their fifth birthday. About a quarter of the world’s live births occur in Africa, but so too do half of the total number of under-five deaths worldwide. Of the 26 countries worldwide with an under-five mortality rate (U5MR) of above 100 per 1,000 live births, 24 are in Sub-Saharan Africa. Figure 1 depicts the U5MR for Africa, Northern Africa, and Sub-Saharan Africa (per 1,000 live births). It also shows the five best and worst performers in the continent for this indicator.
    • Economic statistics
      The recovery in the global economy proved sluggish in 2011, dragged down by increasing strains in the eurozone, particularly the sovereign debt crisis in Greece and austerity measures, which curbed consumer demand. Structural fragilities were especially evident in private sector balance sheets, as financial markets were buffeted by a series of shocks (oil and food price volatility, the earthquake and tsunami in Japan, the Arab Spring, etc.). Global activity weakened during the year and became more uneven, with business and investor confidence falling sharply, increasing the downside risks. Against this backdrop, global growth eased to about 3.9 percent in 2011 from 5.3 percent in 2010, according to the recent IMF outlook.
    • Monetary and financial statistics
      Between 2000 and 2010, the average annual value of Africa’s merchandise imports amounted to US$ 267 billion, with an annual growth rate of 13.1 percent. This was lower than Africa’s merchandise exports, which during the same timeframe recorded an average annual value of US$ 312 billion, with an annual growth rate of 11.8 percent. The trade balance remained in surplus throughout the ten-year period. The only exceptional year was 2009, when there was a slight deficit of US$ 2 billion due to the global economic crisis, which dampened foreign demand for African goods (Figure 1). The average total value of trade balance over the period was US$ 44.0 billion per annum.
    • Economic infrastructure and investment climate
    • Millennium development goals
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