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DOI: 
10.18356/174af1ee-en
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Arab Society: A Compendium of Social Statistics - Issue No. 11

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Author(s):
UN
04 Sep 2014
Pages:
88
ISBN:
9789210565479 (PDF)
DOI: 
10.18356/4e3376b0-en

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The Compendium of Social Statistics and Indicators is a biennial publication published by the Statistics Division of the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA). It typically focuses on such areas as population, education, households and family, human settlements, health and economic activity. In the hope of widening the audience of this publication, the eleventh issue is intended not only as a reference for policymakers and other officials, but also as a snapshot of trends in the region for readers with an interest in the social climate of Western Asia, including academics, students, journalists and the general public.
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  • Acknowledgments
    Arab Society: A Compendium of Social Statistics is the latest in a series of biennial compendia of the Statistics Division of the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA). It provides a general view of Arab society in the ESCWA region and the changes it has encountered over time. Drawing on data provided mainly from national statistical offices (NSOs), it focuses on issues of population, employment, housing conditions, education, health and culture.
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  • Introduction
    Arab Society: A Compendium of Social Statistics is the latest in a series of biennial compendia of the Statistics Division of the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA). It provides a broad description of Arab society in the region and how it is changing over time. Drawing on data provided mainly from National Statistical Offices (NSOs), it focuses on population dynamics, employment, education, housing conditions, health, poverty and culture. Other issues of social concern such as crime, justice or social protection have been omitted due to the lack of reliable data.
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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Country education profiles

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    • Egypt
      Adult literacy increased in Egypt from 66 per cent in 2006 to 74 per cent in 2012. Female literacy increased from 58 to 66 per cent between 2006 and 2012, while male literacy increased from 75 to 82 per cent in the same period. Male literacy was higher than female literacy by 16 per cent in 2012.
    • Iraq
      Between 2000 and 2011, adult literacy increased in Iraq from 74 to 78 per cent. Female literacy increased from 64 to 71 per cent in the same period. In 2011, male literacy was higher than female literacy by 14.8 percent points.
    • Jordan
      Between 2003 and 2011, adult literacy increased from 90 to 96 per cent. Female literacy increased from 85 to 94 per cent in the same period. In 2011, male literacy was four percentage points higher than female literacy.
    • Kuwait
      Between 2004 and 2012, adult literacy increased from 92 to 95 per cent. Female literacy increased from 90 to 94 per cent in the same period. In 2012, male literacy was two percentage points higher than female literacy.
    • Lebanon
      Between 2004 and 2009, adult literacy increased in Lebanon from 85 to 91 per cent. Female literacy increased from 82 to 88 per cent in the same period. In 2009, male literacy was higher than female literacy by six percentage points.
    • Morocco
      Between 2004 and 2011, adult literacy increased from 52 to 67 per cent. Female literacy increased from 40 to 58 per cent in the same period. In 2011, male literacy was 19 percentage points higher than female literacy.
    • Oman
      Between 2003 and 2010, total literacy in Oman increased from 81 to 87 per cent. Even though female literacy increased from 74 to 82 per cent during that period, male literacy exceeded female literacy by eight percentage points.
    • Palestine
      Between 2004 and 2012, total literacy increased in Palestine from 92 to 96 per cent. Female literacy increased from 88 to 94 per cent in the same period. In 2012, male literacy was five percentage points higher than female literacy.
    • Qatar
      Between 2001 and 2012, adult literacy increased in Qatar from 89 to 97 per cent. Female literacy increased from 87 to 96 per cent in the same period. In 2012, male literacy was one percentage point higher than female literacy.
    • Saudi Arabia
      Between 2000 and 2011, adult literacy increased from 79 to 87 per cent. Female literacy increased from 69 per cent to 82 per cent in the same period. In 2011, male literacy was nine percentage points higher than female literacy.
    • The Sudan (pre-succession)
      Between 2000 and 2011, adult literacy increased from 61 to 72 per cent. Female literacy increased from 52 to 63 per cent in the same period. In 2011, male literacy was 18 percentage points higher than female literacy.
    • Syrian Arab Republic
      Adult literacy in the Syrian Arab Republic increased from 81 per cent in 2004 to 84 per cent in 2011. Female literacy increased from 73 to 78 per cent and in male literacy increased from 88 to 91 per cent in the same period. In 2010, male literacy was 14 percentage points higher than female literacy.
    • Tunisia
      Between 2004 and 2010, adult literacy increased from 74 to 79 per cent. In the same period, female literacy increased from 65 to 71 per cent, with male literacy higher than female literacy by 16 percentage points in 2010.
    • Yemen
      Literacy in Yemen is relatively low compared to other Arab countries. However, between 2004 and 2011, total literacy increased from 55 to 65 per cent. In the same period, female literacy increased from 36 to 49 per cent. In 2011, male literacy was 33 percentage points higher than female literacy.
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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Selected social indicators

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    • Population
      Countries in the Arab region are at different stages of the demographic transition, giving the region diverse demographic features. These differences are due to a wide range of country-specific social, economic, political and cultural factors. The region presently includes countries with markedly different population sizes, age-sex structures, growth rates and population composition. Those features are determined by the speed of change in three main components of demographic change, namely fertility, mortality, and international migration, including labour migration and war-related population displacement. Understanding demographic change is crucial from a policy perspective because it affects almost every aspect of life and has important implications for the labour market, economic growth, employment, housing and demand for education, health and social services in any country. Reliable data on the size and structure of populations, as well as on components of demographic change, are therefore essential to understanding socioeconomic trends and informing public policy decisions at the national level. Such data are also important for measuring performance against internationally agreed development goals.
    • Labour
      Women and youth participate in the labour force at categorically lower rates than adult men in the Arab region, often by a wide margin. Adults who participate in the labour force typically face high unemployment rates, which are even higher amongst women and youth populations.
    • Housing conditions
      Decent housing is a both need and a right for families. It has a direct impact on the health and well-being of a population and provides a secure environment for the development of society. Six indicators of housing conditions are used in this section: average number of persons per room, tenure of housing units, existence of flush toilet inside the housing unit, access to public piped water, availability of public sewage network, and source of electricity. The data used here mainly come from national household surveys and the 2000 and 2010 census rounds.
    • Education
      The attainment of education in a population is widely recognized as an important factor in socio-economic development. Compulsory education has therefore been a major policy goal in virtually all countries across the world. Formal schooling equips people with the skills required by a modern labour market and is directly related to employment and wages. It also contributes to better health and well-being among a population. Data on education are important for designing education policies and plans. As fertility rates are high in Arab countries, the number of pupils increases annually, which necessitates an increase in both human and financial resources for education.
    • Health
      The state of health in a population depends on both the quality of health services and the willingness of individuals to make healthy lifestyle choices. This chapter includes three sections: (1) maternal health, (2) lifestyle or health risk factors and (3) health resources.
    • Poverty
      With nearly half of the population of the least developed countries of the region living in poverty, effective poverty reduction strategies are a priority for many ESCWA countries. Poverty is also a public policy concern in virtually all middle income countries.
    • Culture
      A country's art, history, heritage, music, folklore, food, values and religions all fall under the umbrella of culture. The ESCWA region is home to rich and varied cultures. An in-depth analysis of culture in the region is beyond the scope of this chapter, but it will touch upon a few cultural indicators relevant to the discussion.
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