Asia-Pacific Development Journal

English
Frequency
Semiannual
ISSN: 
2411-9873 (online)
DOI: 
10.18356/cb961558-en
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The Asia-Pacific Development Journal (APDJ) is published twice a year by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific. The primary objective of the APDJ is to provide a platform for the exchange of knowledge, experience, ideas, information and data on all aspects of economic and social development issues and concerns facing the region and aims to stimulate policy debate and assist policy formulation. The APDJ provides a scholarly means for bringing together research work by eminent social scientists and development practitioners from the region and beyond for use by a variety of stakeholders. The Journal aims to stimulate policy debate and assist policy formulation in the region.
 

Latest Articles Hide / Show all Abstracts

Mark Number Date Article Volume and Issue Click to Access
  12 Apr 2017 Challenges in achieving the sustainable development goal on good health and well-being: Global governance as an issue for the means of implementation
Yasushi Katsuma, Hideaki Shiroyama, Makiko Matsuo

To formulate health development policy and strategies aimed at the Sustainable Development Goal 3, which seeks to ensuring health and well-being for all, it is indispensable to revisit the issue of global health governance in the wake of the Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa. The issue of global health governance is also relevant in the Asia-Pacific region, where Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), influenza A (H1N1) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) were health security threats. The failure to respond timely and effectively to the health crisis was derived from a few factors that are relevant to the means of implementation necessary to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. During ordinary times, efforts to enhance health systems should include building the core capacities of the International Health Regulations (IHR), which should be supported not only by the World Health Organization (WHO), but also through coordination among diverse multilateral and bilateral organizations as part of their health development cooperation programmes associated with achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. To enhance preparedness for handling health crises, the organizational capacities of WHO and its regional offices need to be strengthened. In addition, coordination among WHO and other actors should be facilitated in accordance with the situational categories based on the combination of (a) the capacity of the country where an outbreak of an infectious disease is occurring and (b) the severity and magnitude of that infectious disease.

Volume 23 Issue 2
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/f1734fa7-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/challenges-in-achieving-the-sustainable-development-goal-on-good-health-and-well-being-global-governance-as-an-issue-for-the-means-of-implementation_f1734fa7-en
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  12 Apr 2017 Participation in development: Learning from the past and present in the Republic of Korea
Yunjeong Yang

The present study draws on two case studies, one on village dynamics during the 1970s rural community development movement in the Republic of Korea and the other on present day challenges and learning based on the experiences of a non-governmental organization from the Republic of Korea in implementing a community project together with local villagers in Cambodia. The study argues that the participatory approach, despite recent criticism and challenges associated with it, should remain the core mode of development cooperation because of its intrinsic and instrumental values in efforts to develop a sustainable community. Local leaders’ accountability and leadership, as well as genuine partnerships, involving equitable sharing of power in decisionmaking among various stakeholders, including external donor agencies, are also underlined as crucial in engaging local people in their own development initiatives.

Volume 23 Issue 2
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/cbf9b239-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/participation-in-development-learning-from-the-past-and-present-in-the-republic-of-korea_cbf9b239-en
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  12 Apr 2017 Financing sustainable development with enhanced domestic resource mobilization: Transitional role of international cooperation
Koji Yamada

The Sustainable Development Goals are very comprehensive, reflecting the increased diversification and complication involved with the development challenges the world is facing in the post-2015 period. Also taking place is a dramatic change in the global landscape of development finance, in which domestic public revenues have risen rapidly to become the largest source of finance. Official development assistance (ODA) for domestic resource mobilization (DRM) will remain essential to accelerate economic growth and lift people from extreme poverty, particularly in the low-income countries. The combination of technical assistance and increased financing for capacity-building can play a vital role in strengthening DRM and lead to more effective and efficient use of public expenditure. The present report first reviews the latest literature on the rationale for this path and the emphasis on public domestic resource mobilization. It then looks at the two-decade experience of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) with the Mongolian tax authority as an example of international cooperation that supports enhanced DRM. After reviewing the events chronologically from the mid-1990s to the 2010s, key takeaways from JICA are given with a focus on capacity development. Finally, the report discusses the transitional role of international cooperation in this regard. It points out that to effectively carry out capacity development, a long-term commitment and joint concerted efforts from the global community are needed. This, in turn, requires a change in mindset from being oriented towards results management at the individual project level to applying programme-based management, which entails combining different types of operations to meet the national development goals and strategy. In addition, it must go hand-in-hand with strong country ownership to come up with indigenous solutions. In the case involving JICA and the Mongolian tax authority, implementing quick-impact projects and showing the impacts at each stage has convinced the latter of the need for a long-term commitment to the results. The long-term commitment of traditional donors from the North could facilitate the participation of emerging donors in a concerted manner. It could scale up capacity development efforts by facilitating triangular cooperation to promote DRM in many countries.

Volume 23 Issue 2
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/2d6ed3dd-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/financing-sustainable-development-with-enhanced-domestic-resource-mobilization-transitional-role-of-international-cooperation_2d6ed3dd-en
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  12 Apr 2017 In quest of universal goals: Analysis of statements from the open working group on sustainable development goals and the United Nations general assembly voting
Denis Degterev

On 25 September 2015, during the 70th anniversary session of the United Nations General Assembly, the 193 Member States adopted a comprehensive and ambitious set of development goals aimed at the eradication of poverty in all its forms. The present article analyses the consultative process of the Sustainable Development Goals, as well as the positions of countries in negotiations, divided into two groups: donor countries and recipient countries. As to the consultative process, a detailed analysis of the main groups is submitted, along with the institutional design of the process. In addition, a comprehensive review of the countries’ positions in the Open Working Group (OWG) on Sustainable Development Goals, which includes a comparative analysis of the donor country statements (traditional, BRICS (Brazil, Russian Federation, India, China and South Africa) and Arabic donors) and statements from recipient countries (by region) is presented. The position of the Russian Federation as a donor country is particularly noted. This position along with that of other BRICS countries is closer to position held by recipient countries, namely the Global South position. An analysis of the G20 countries’ annual voting on the United Nations General Assembly resolution 41/128: Declaration on the Right to Development is also provided. In conclusion, the progress achieved in the negotiation process for setting the Sustainable Development Goals presents a solid platform for further progressive work and the opportunity to tackle global challenges.

Volume 23 Issue 2
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/fca2d7e0-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/in-quest-of-universal-goals-analysis-of-statements-from-the-open-working-group-on-sustainable-development-goals-and-the-united-nations-general-assembly-voting_fca2d7e0-en
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  12 Apr 2017 An analysis on the potential competitiveness of the Asian infrastructure investment bank
Meibo Huang, Na Chen, Yanhong Chen

The establishment of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) is a response to the wide gap between the financing need and supply of global infrastructure investment, especially in Asia. The potential competiveness of AIIB, as compared to other multilateral development banks, is that it has a more focused function, better balanced governance structure and sound financing and can strike a balance between the requirements of developing countries and conducting operations efficiently.

Volume 23 Issue 2
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9c6a8442-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/an-analysis-on-the-potential-competitiveness-of-the-asian-infrastructure-investment-bank_9c6a8442-en
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  12 Apr 2017 Sustainable development goals and Japan: Sustainability overshadows poverty reduction
Tatsufumi Yamagata

The Development Cooperation Charter of Japan, which replaced the Official Development Assistance (ODA) Charter in February 2015, drives the country’s cooperation towards non-poor countries and non-poverty issues. The Sustainable Development Goals put Japan forward in these directions. As a result, the country’s focus on global poverty reduction is overshadowed by its national interests and sustainability under the concept of universality, which is a core principle of the Goals and differentiates them from the Millennium Development Goals.

Volume 23 Issue 2
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/5d804069-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/sustainable-development-goals-and-japan-sustainability-overshadows-poverty-reduction_5d804069-en
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  07 Feb 2017 The administrative efficiency of conditional cash transfer programmes: evidence from the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program
Ma. Cecilia L. Catubig, Renato A. Villano, Brian Dollery

The present paper examines the administrative efficiency of implementing the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) in the Philippines. Using data collected at a municipal level for four provinces in the Davao Region, administrative efficiency scores were computed, employing cost transfer ratios (CTR) and data envelopment analysis (DEA) for the individual municipal operations offices (MOOs) implementing the programme. CTR estimates showed that the greatest proportion of total expenditure in cash transfer programmes was direct cash transfers, which implied an efficient use of programme funding. The DEA results showed an average technical efficiency score of 0.905, which implied that there was significant potential to further improve the performance of delivery of 4Ps. The results revealed that relatively high technical efficiency scores of MOOs did not necessarily translate into a more cost-efficient implementation of the programme. Nevertheless, a positive correlation was found between CTR and the high technical efficiency scores of the MOOs implementing the programme.

Volume 23 Issue 1
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/50a83f5e-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/the-administrative-efficiency-of-conditional-cash-transfer-programmes-evidence-from-the-pantawid-pamilyang-pilipino-program_50a83f5e-en
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  07 Feb 2017 Impact of population on carbon emission: lessons from India
Chandrima Sikdar, Kakali Mukhopadhyay

The global population is more than seven billion and will likely reach nine billion by 2050. As India is home to 18 per cent of the world’s population, but has only 2.4 per cent of the land area, a great deal of pressure is being placed on all of the country’s natural resources. The increasing population has been trending towards an alarming situation; the United Nations has estimated that the country’s population will increase to 1.8 billion by the 2050 and, by 2028, it will overtake China as the world’s most populous country. The growing population and the environmental deterioration are becoming major impediments in the country’s drive to achieve sustained development in the country.

Volume 23 Issue 1
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/b4c7cba0-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/impact-of-population-on-carbon-emission-lessons-from-india_b4c7cba0-en
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  07 Feb 2017 The impacts of climatic and non-climatic factors on household food security: a study on the poor living in the Malaysian East Coast Economic Region
Mahmudul Alam, Chamhuri Siwar, Abu N.M. Wahid

Sustainable food security at the household level is a national concern in many countries. The reasons for household food insecurity include, among others, social, economic, political, and personal factors, as well as climatic changes and its outcomes. This research aims to determine the linkage of the factors of climatic changes, non-climatic factors and household resiliencies with the level of household food security among the poor and low income households in Malaysia. The present study is based on primary data that were collected in July and October 2012 through a questionnaire survey of 460 poor and low-income households from the Pahang, Kelantan, and Terengganu States of Malaysia. The sample was selected from E-Kasih poor household database based on a cluster random sampling technique. Initially the study measures household food security according to the United States Agency for International Development – Household Food Insecurity Access (USAIDHFIA) model, and has run ordinal regressions under the logit and probit models. This study finds that household food insecurity is not only linked with social and economic factors, but also significantly linked with the climatic factors. Therefore, food security programmes must be integrated with the programmes for climatic change adaptation.

Volume 23 Issue 1
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/23802531-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/the-impacts-of-climatic-and-non-climatic-factors-on-household-food-security-a-study-on-the-poor-living-in-the-malaysian-east-coast-economic-region_23802531-en
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  07 Feb 2017 Food prices and the development of manufacturing in India
Richard Grabowski

Structural change associated with rapid growth has not occurred in labour-intensive manufacturing in India. It is argued in the present paper that this is at least partly due to the rise in the relative cost of labour, which is the result of the rising cost of food stemming from rapid overall growth and sluggish growth in agricultural productivity. A theoretical model has been developed and the experience of India is used to illustrate the model and its implications.

Volume 23 Issue 1
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/d489dd46-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/food-prices-and-the-development-of-manufacturing-in-india_d489dd46-en
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