International Trade Statistics Yearbook (Ser. G)

English
ISSN: 
2412-1355 (online)
DOI: 
10.18356/e9aba95b-en
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This publication is issued in two volumes which offer a comprehensive view of the topic. Volume I: Trade by Country, compiled in May of each year, presents detailed data on imports and exports by commodity and trading partner. Volume II: trade by Commodity contains the detailed tables showing international trade for a variety of commodities and world trade tables covering trade values and indices. The presented data, charts and analyses will benefit policymakers, government agencies, the business and finance sectors, non-government organizations, civil society organizations, journalists, academics, researchers, students and anyone who is interested in trade issues.
 
International Trade Statistics Yearbook 2014, Volume I

International Trade Statistics Yearbook 2014, Volume I

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Author(s):
UN
14 Feb 2014
Pages:
424
ISBN:
9789210574068 (PDF)
DOI: 
10.18356/c87e4ced-en

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The 2014 International Trade Statistics Yearbook (2014 ITSY) is the sixty-third edition of this yearbook. Its objective is to inform about the detailed merchandise and services imports and exports of individual countries (areas) by commodity and service category and by partner country (volume I), the world trade in individual commodities (3-digit SITC groups) (volume II) and total world merchandise trade - up to the year 2014.

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  • Preface
    The 2014 International Trade Statistics Yearbook (2014 ITSY) is the sixty-third edition of this yearbook. Its objective is to inform about the detailed merchandise and services imports and exports of individual countries (areas) by commodity and service category and by partner country (volume I), the world trade in individual commodities (3-digit SITC groups) (volume II) and total world merchandise trade - up to the year 2014. The two volumes are prepared at different points in time during 2015: Volume I - Trade by Country is made electronically available in June, and Volume II - Trade by Commodity, in December, as the preparation of the tables in Volume II requires additional country data which, normally, become available later in the year.
  • Introduction
    The International Trade Statistics Yearbook: Volume I - Trade by Country, provides an overview of the latest trends of trade in goods and services of most countries and areas in the world. The publication is aimed at both specialist trade data users and common audience at large. The presented data, charts and analyses will benefit policy makers, government agencies, non-government organizations, civil society organizations, journalists, academics, researchers, students, businesses and anyone who is interested in trade issues.
  • Abbreviations and explanation of symbols
    Names of some countries (or areas) or groups of countries (or areas) and of some commodities or groups of commodities have been abbreviated. Exact titles of countries or commodities can be found in various editions of the following publications:
  • Disclaimer
    The tables, graphs and text contained in this publication are provided only for illustration and despite all efforts might contain errors. When using this data users are advised to verify the latest information on UN Comtrade and UN ServiceTrade which is the source of this data.
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    • Afghanistan
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Afghanistan increased moderately by 10.8 percent to reach 570.5 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 10.0 percent to reach 7.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 7.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Southern Asia at -2.6 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Afghanistan were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 3 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 3 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Afghanistan decreased moderately by 12.1 percent, reaching 3.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 73.8 percent and reached 2.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 817.0 mln US$. -10
    • Albania
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Albania increased slightly by 4.3 percent to reach 2.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 7.2 percent to reach 5.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 2.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -1.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Albania were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Albania increased slightly by 2.8 percent, reaching 2.2 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 16.9 percent and reached 2.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 14.0 mln US$. See footnote*.
    • Algeria
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Algeria decreased slightly by 4.2 percent to reach 63.2 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 6.8 percent to reach 58.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 4.6 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 10.6 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Algeria were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 19 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Algeria increased moderately by 6.8 percent, reaching 4.0 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased substantially by 11.8 percent and reached 11.0 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 7.0 bln US$.
    • Antigua and Barbuda
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Antigua and Barbuda decreased substantially by 29.9 percent to reach 23.1 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 22.9 percent to reach 391.6 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 368.5 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -192.5 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Antigua and Barbuda were diversified amongst partners; imports were highly concentrated. The top 9 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Antigua and Barbuda increased slightly by 0.2 percent, reaching 482.5 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 3.2 percent and reached 204.1 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 278.4 mln US$.
    • Argentina
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Argentina decreased substantially by 10.8 percent to reach 68.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 11.3 percent to reach 65.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 3.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -6.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Argentina were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 28 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Argentina decreased moderately by 6.3 percent, reaching 14.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 1.4 percent and reached 18.7 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 4.3 bln US$.
    • Armenia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Armenia increased slightly by 1.5 percent to reach 1.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 2.3 percent to reach 4.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 2.7 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG CIS at -966.4 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Armenia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Armenia increased moderately by 5.5 percent, reaching 1.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.3 percent and reached 1.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services deficit of 114.6 mln US$.
    • Aruba
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Aruba decreased substantially by 30.7 percent to reach 116.2 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 1.5 percent to reach 1.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 1.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -699.9 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Aruba were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were highly concentrated. The top 4 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Aruba increased moderately by 7.1 percent, reaching 1.9 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 3.6 percent and reached 848.6 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 1.0 bln US$.
    • Australia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Australia decreased slightly by 4.6 percent to reach 240.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 2.1 percent to reach 227.5 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 12.9 bln US$ in 2014, down slightly from the surplus of 19.7 bln US$ in 2013 (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at 45.6 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Australia were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Australia increased slightly by 0.5 percent, reaching 53.4 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.6 percent and reached 66.6 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 13.1 bln US$.
    • Austria
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Austria increased slightly by 4.7 percent to reach 166.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 2.2 percent to reach 173.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 7.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -10.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Austria were diversified amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Austria increased moderately by 7.3 percent, reaching 64.9 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 7.3 percent and reached 45.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 19.4 bln US$.
    • Azerbaijan
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Azerbaijan decreased moderately by 9.0 percent to reach 21.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 14.7 percent to reach 9.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large surplus of 12.6 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 8.5 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Azerbaijan were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Azerbaijan increased substantially by 57.4 percent, reaching 4.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 26.1 percent and reached 7.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 2.9 bln US$.
    • Bahamas
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of the Bahamas decreased slightly by 2.1 percent to reach 811.5 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 7.7 percent to reach 3.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 2.6 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -2.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Bahamas were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. One partner accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 1 partner accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of the Bahamas increased moderately by 5.2 percent, reaching 2.8 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 19.0 percent and reached 1.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 1.2 bln US$.
    • Bahrain
      In 2012, the value of merchandise exports of Bahrain decreased substantially by 26.3 percent to reach 16.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 19.2 percent to reach 14.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 2.4 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at 1.9 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Bahrain were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Bahrain increased substantially by 146.6 percent, reaching 2.8 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 121.2 percent and reached 1.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 1.3 bln US$.
    • Bangladesh
      In 2011, the value of merchandise exports of Bangladesh increased substantially by 26.4 percent to reach 24.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 35.1 percent to reach 41.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 16.9 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG South-eastern Asia at -15.9 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Bangladesh were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Bangladesh increased moderately by 9.6 percent, reaching 2.5 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 17.9 percent and reached 5.8 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 3.3 bln US$.
    • Barbados
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Barbados increased slightly by 2.9 percent to reach 480.8 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 1.6 percent to reach 1.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 1.3 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -553.6 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Barbados were diversified amongst partners; while imports were relatively concentrated. The top 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2010, the value of exports of services of Barbados increased substantially by 34.2 percent, reaching 569.0 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 3.5 percent and reached 661.0 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services deficit of 92.0 mln US$.
    • Belarus
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Belarus decreased slightly by 2.2 percent to reach 36.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 6.0 percent to reach 40.5 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 4.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG CIS at -3.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Belarus were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were highly concentrated. The top 9 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 9 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Belarus increased substantially by 15.8 percent, reaching 6.9 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 15.1 percent and reached 4.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 2.5 bln US$.
    • Belgium
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Belgium decreased moderately by 7.7 percent to reach 472.2 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 7.3 percent to reach 452.8 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance decreased slightly from the record high surplus of 23.1 bln US$ in 2013, and the country recorded a surplus of 19.4 bln US$ in 2014 (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 35.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Belgium were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 16 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Belgium increased moderately by 7.3 percent, reaching 109.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 7.3 percent and reached 98.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 10.7 bln US$.
    • Belize
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Belize decreased substantially by 12.7 percent to reach 359.1 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 7.8 percent to reach 1.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 645.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Latin America and the Caribbean at -243.9 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Belize were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 8 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Belize increased substantially by 10.3 percent, reaching 447.8 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 11.6 percent and reached 207.8 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 240.1 mln US$.
    • Benin
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Benin increased substantially by 58.0 percent to reach 951.0 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 22.3 percent to reach 3.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 2.6 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -916.5 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Benin were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 16 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Benin decreased slightly by 1.5 percent, reaching 407.1 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 13.1 percent and reached 569.6 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 162.4 mln US$.
    • Bermuda
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Bermuda decreased substantially by 44.9 percent to reach 12.0 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 3.4 percent to reach 961.1 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 949.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -805.0 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Bermuda were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Bermuda decreased slightly by 0.7 percent, reaching 1.4 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 0.2 percent and reached 898.3 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 472.3 mln US$.
    • Bhutan
      In 2012, the value of merchandise exports of Bhutan increased substantially by 17.3 percent to reach 531.2 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 5.7 percent to reach 991.7 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 460.5 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Southern Asia at -273.9 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Bhutan were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 1 partner accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Bhutan decreased substantially by 42.4 percent, reaching 73.8 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased substantially by 46.7 percent and reached 100.9 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 27.2 mln US$.
    • Bolivia (plurinational state of)
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of the Plurinational State of Bolivia increased moderately by 5.3 percent to reach 12.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 12.2 percent to reach 10.5 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate surplus of 2.4 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Latin America and the Caribbean at 3.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Plurinational State of Bolivia were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of the Plurinational State of Bolivia increased slightly by 4.0 percent, reaching 1.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 12.5 percent and reached 2.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 1.1 bln US$.
    • Bosnia and Herzegovina
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Bosnia and Herzegovina increased slightly by 3.6 percent to reach 5.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 6.8 percent to reach 11.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 5.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -2.1 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Bosnia and Herzegovina were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Bosnia and Herzegovina increased slightly by 4.9 percent, reaching 2.0 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 1.8 percent and reached 483.5 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 1.5 bln US$.
    • Botswana
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Botswana increased substantially by 26.8 percent to reach 7.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 7.4 percent to reach 7.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 139.8 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Sub-Saharan Africa at -4.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Botswana were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 3 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Botswana increased substantially by 78.2 percent, reaching 542.4 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased substantially by 21.2 percent and reached 528.3 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 14.1 mln US$.
    • Brazil
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Brazil decreased moderately by 7.1 percent to reach 225.1 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 4.4 percent to reach 229.1 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 4.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -8.5 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Brazil were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 27 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 22 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Brazil decreased slightly by 1.8 percent, reaching 39.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 6.6 percent and reached 86.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 47.1 bln US$.
    • Brunei Darussalam
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Brunei Darussalam decreased moderately by 8.2 percent to reach 10.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 0.4 percent to reach 3.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large surplus of 6.9 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Asia-Pacific at 4.9 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Brunei Darussalam were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 8 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2009, the value of exports of services of Brunei Darussalam increased moderately by 5.5 percent, reaching 914.9 mln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.3 percent and reached 1.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 519.3 mln US$.
    • Bulgaria
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Bulgaria decreased slightly by 0.4 percent to reach 29.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 1.3 percent to reach 34.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 5.4 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG CIS at -4.9 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Bulgaria were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 21 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 16 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Bulgaria decreased slightly by 0.9 percent, reaching 7.4 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 3.8 percent and reached 4.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 3.0 bln US$.
    • Burkina Faso
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Burkina Faso increased moderately by 7.4 percent to reach 2.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 18.1 percent to reach 3.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 729.5 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Sub-Saharan Africa at -1.1 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Burkina Faso were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Burkina Faso increased substantially by 13.0 percent, reaching 476.6 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 15.7 percent and reached 1.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 932.7 mln US$.
    • Burundi
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Burundi decreased substantially by 31.2 percent to reach 141.5 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 6.8 percent to reach 672.6 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 531.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Sub-Saharan Africa at -117.0 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Burundi were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Burundi increased substantially by 39.7 percent, reaching 129.9 mln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 9.3 percent and reached 231.7 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 101.8 mln US$.
    • Cabo Verde
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Cabo Verde increased substantially by 24.1 percent to reach 69.2 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 3.8 percent to reach 726.4 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 657.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -513.1 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Cabo Verde were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Cabo Verde increased moderately by 8.8 percent, reaching 650.2 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 9.1 percent and reached 268.8 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 381.4 mln US$.
    • Cambodia
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Cambodia increased substantially by 18.0 percent to reach 9.2 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 30.7 percent to reach 9.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 20.7 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -2.6 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Cambodia were diversified amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Cambodia increased moderately by 9.5 percent, reaching 2.8 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 14.4 percent and reached 1.8 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 1.0 bln US$.
    • Cameroon
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Cameroon increased moderately by 5.8 percent to reach 4.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 2.2 percent to reach 6.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 2.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Sub-Saharan Africa at -1.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Cameroon were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 19 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Cameroon decreased substantially by 12.4 percent, reaching 1.6 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 7.4 percent and reached 2.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 500.4 mln US$.
    • Canada
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Canada increased slightly by 3.6 percent to reach 472.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 0.1 percent to reach 462.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 10.9 bln US$ in 2014, following a relatively small deficit of 5.2 bln US$ in 2013 (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at 109.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Canada were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Canada decreased slightly by 0.3 percent, reaching 85.5 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 0.6 percent and reached 110.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 25.0 bln US$.
    • Central African republic
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of the Central African Republic decreased substantially by 57.5 percent to reach 48.5 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 40.4 percent to reach 129.7 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 81.2 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -30.2 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Central African Republic were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of the Central African Republic increased moderately by 6.3 percent, reaching 69.1 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 14.5 percent and reached 179.0 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 109.9 mln US$.
    • Chile
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Chile decreased slightly by 0.1 percent to reach 76.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 8.6 percent to reach 72.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 4.3 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at 7.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Chile were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Chile increased slightly by 2.7 percent, reaching 12.8 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 6.5 percent and reached 15.7 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 2.9 bln US$.
    • China
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of China increased moderately by 6.0 percent to reach 2342.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 0.4 percent to reach 1958.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a surplus of 384.3 bln US$, the largest surplus recorded (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at 242.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). In 2014, China was the world's top exporter of merchandise goods. Merchandise exports in China were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 25 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 23 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of China increased moderately by 7.6 percent, reaching 206.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 17.6 percent and reached 330.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 124.5 bln US$.
    • China, Hong Kong SAR
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of China, Hong Kong SAR decreased slightly by 2.1 percent to reach 524.1 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 3.3 percent to reach 600.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade deficit recorded a deficit of 76.5 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG South-eastern Asia at -41.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in China, Hong Kong SAR were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 9 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and the same number of partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of China, Hong Kong SAR increased moderately by 7.0 percent, reaching 129.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 4.2 percent and reached 58.7 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 70.6 bln US$, up from the trade in services surplus in 2011 of 64.6 bln US$.
    • China, Macao SAR
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of China, Macao SAR was 1.2 bln US$, while its merchandise imports was 11.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 10.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -4.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in China, Macao SAR were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 8 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of China, Macao SAR increased substantially by 18.1 percent, reaching 53.5 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 7.7 percent and reached 11.7 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 41.8 bln US$.
    • Colombia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Colombia decreased moderately by 6.8 percent to reach 54.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 7.8 percent to reach 64.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 9.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -7.6 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Colombia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Colombia increased moderately by 8.0 percent, reaching 6.9 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 3.6 percent and reached 12.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 5.3 bln US$.
    • Congo
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of the Congo increased substantially by 40.5 percent to reach 10.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 13.9 percent to reach 8.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate surplus of 2.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at 3.9 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Congo were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 9 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of the Congo increased slightly by 3.2 percent, reaching 488.5 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 5.9 percent and reached 5.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 4.6 bln US$.
    • Cook Islands
      In 2011, the value of merchandise exports of the Cook Islands decreased substantially by 39.5 percent to reach 3.1 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 20.6 percent to reach 109.3 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 106.2 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Asia- Pacific at -88.8 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Cook Islands were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 4 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). No trade in services data is available.
    • Costa Rica
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Costa Rica increased slightly by 2.0 percent to reach 11.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 1.3 percent to reach 18.1 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 6.7 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -4.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Costa Rica were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were highly concentrated. The top 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Costa Rica increased moderately by 9.1 percent, reaching 6.0 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 2.8 percent and reached 2.0 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 4.0 bln US$.
    • Côte d’Ivoire
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Côte d?Ivoire increased substantially by 11.3 percent to reach 12.1 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 27.8 percent to reach 12.5 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 399.2 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Latin America and the Caribbean at -1.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Côte d?Ivoire were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Côte d?Ivoire increased slightly by 4.8 percent, reaching 1.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 10.8 percent and reached 3.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 2.2 bln US$.
    • Croatia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Croatia increased moderately by 8.4 percent to reach 13.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 4.2 percent to reach 22.9 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 9.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -8.5 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Croatia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Croatia increased moderately by 5.8 percent, reaching 12.6 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 1.3 percent and reached 3.6 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 9.0 bln US$. See footnote*.
    • Cyprus
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Cyprus decreased moderately by 10.0 percent to reach 1.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 6.1 percent to reach 6.8 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 4.9 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -3.9 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Cyprus were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 25 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Cyprus increased substantially by 33.3 percent, reaching 10.6 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 78.4 percent and reached 6.6 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 4.0 bln US$.
    • Czech republic
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of the Czech Republic increased moderately by 7.6 percent to reach 173.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 6.7 percent to reach 152.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 21.7 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 41.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Czech Republic were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of the Czech Republic increased moderately by 8.8 percent, reaching 24.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 4.2 percent and reached 20.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 3.7 bln US$.
    • Denmark
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Denmark decreased slightly by 0.6 percent to reach 109.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 1.5 percent to reach 99.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 10.7 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -4.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Denmark were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Denmark increased moderately by 9.1 percent, reaching 72.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 10.8 percent and reached 64.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 7.6 bln US$.
    • Dominica
      In 2012, the value of merchandise exports of Dominica was at 37.0 mln US$ while its merchandise imports reached 211.9 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 174.9 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -81.2 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Dominica were diversified amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 8 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Dominica decreased substantially by 19.8 percent, reaching 124.1 mln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.6 percent and reached 67.6 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 56.5 mln US$.
    • Dominican republic
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Dominican Republic increased substantially by 24.7 percent to reach 9.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 0.5 percent to reach 17.8 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 7.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Latin America and the Caribbean at -2.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Dominican Republic were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Dominican Republic increased moderately by 6.5 percent, reaching 6.4 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 0.1 percent and reached 2.8 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 3.5 bln US$.
    • Ecuador
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Ecuador increased slightly by 3.1 percent to reach 25.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 1.7 percent to reach 27.5 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 1.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -5.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Ecuador were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Ecuador increased substantially by 14.0 percent, reaching 1.8 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.1 percent and reached 3.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 1.4 bln US$.
    • Egypt
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Egypt decreased moderately by 6.8 percent to reach 26.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 7.0 percent to reach 71.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 44.5 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -14.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Egypt were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 26 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 22 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Egypt decreased substantially by 16.1 percent, reaching 18.3 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 0.7 percent and reached 16.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 1.9 bln US$. See footnote*.
    • El Salvador
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of El Salvador decreased slightly by 4.0 percent to reach 5.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 2.4 percent to reach 10.5 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 5.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -1.9 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in El Salvador were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 4 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of El Salvador increased substantially by 13.3 percent, reaching 1.5 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 11.1 percent and reached 1.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 184.1 mln US$.
    • Estonia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Estonia decreased slightly by 3.9 percent to reach 17.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 0.3 percent to reach 20.1 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 2.5 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -1.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Estonia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Estonia increased substantially by 16.5 percent, reaching 6.4 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 21.0 percent and reached 4.7 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 1.6 bln US$.
    • Ethiopia
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Ethiopia increased substantially by 41.0 percent to reach 4.1 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 25.1 percent to reach 14.9 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 10.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -3.1 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Ethiopia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Ethiopia increased substantially by 19.6 percent, reaching 3.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 22.7 percent and reached 4.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 1.1 bln US$.
    • Fiji
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Fiji increased substantially by 23.9 percent to reach 1.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 15.0 percent to reach 3.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 1.9 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG South-eastern Asia at -1.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Fiji were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 8 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Fiji increased slightly by 4.4 percent, reaching 1.2 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 6.4 percent and reached 570.8 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 637.5 mln US$.
    • Finland
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Finland decreased slightly by 0.4 percent to reach 74.2 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 1.3 percent to reach 76.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 2.4 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG CIS at -5.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Finland were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 19 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 16 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Finland increased slightly by 1.1 percent, reaching 28.5 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 1.9 percent and reached 30.7 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services deficit of 2.2 bln US$.
    • France including Monaco
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of France decreased slightly by 0.2 percent to reach 566.7 bln US$, and its merchandise imports also decreased slightly by 1.7 percent to reach 659.9 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 93.2 bln US$, a slight reduction from the deficit of 101.8 bln US$ in 2013 (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -49.9 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in France were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 24 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 22 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of France increased substantially by 16.5 percent, reaching 252.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 33.7 percent and reached 233.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 18.9 bln US$.
    • French Polynesia
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of French Polynesia increased moderately by 9.0 percent to reach 151.5 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 6.4 percent to reach 1.8 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 1.7 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -673.8 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in French Polynesia were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 4 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of French Polynesia increased substantially by 31.6 percent, reaching 1.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.5 percent and reached 517.2 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 615.7 mln US$.
    • Gambia
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of the Gambia decreased substantially by 10.6 percent to reach 106.2 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 7.8 percent to reach 350.2 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 244.0 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -80.3 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Gambia were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 3 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of the Gambia increased moderately by 5.4 percent, reaching 151.5 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 17.3 percent and reached 80.3 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 71.2 mln US$. See footnote*.
    • Georgia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Georgia decreased slightly by 1.6 percent to reach 2.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 7.1 percent to reach 8.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 5.7 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at -1.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Georgia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 16 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Georgia increased substantially by 16.5 percent, reaching 3.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 8.0 percent and reached 1.6 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 1.4 bln US$.
    • Germany
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Germany increased slightly by 3.6 percent to reach 1511.1 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 2.5 percent to reach 1223.8 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a surplus of 287.3 bln US$, the largest surplus the country has ever recorded (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 157.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Germany were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 22 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 20 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Germany decreased slightly by 4.6 percent, reaching 258.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 8.0 percent and reached 319.6 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 61.5 bln US$.
    • Ghana
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Ghana decreased substantially by 19.8 percent to reach 12.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 5.8 percent to reach 12.8 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 143.3 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Sub-Saharan Africa at 2.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Ghana were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 21 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Ghana increased substantially by 74.2 percent, reaching 3.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 15.5 percent and reached 4.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 977.0 mln US$. See footnote*.
    • Greece
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Greece decreased slightly by 1.4 percent to reach 35.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 1.7 percent to reach 62.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 26.4 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -14.1 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Greece were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 24 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Greece increased moderately by 9.0 percent, reaching 38.6 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 5.1 percent and reached 15.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 23.5 bln US$.
    • Greenland
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Greenland increased moderately by 10.3 percent to reach 540.5 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 6.5 percent to reach 768.3 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 227.8 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -200.8 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Greenland were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2006, the value of exports of services of Greenland decreased moderately by 9.8 percent, reaching 203.0 mln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 6.4 percent and reached 315.1 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 112.1 mln US$.
    • Guatemala
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Guatemala increased moderately by 8.2 percent to reach 10.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 4.3 percent to reach 18.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 7.4 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -3.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Guatemala were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were also moderately concentrated. The top 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Guatemala increased slightly by 3.3 percent, reaching 2.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 0.3 percent and reached 2.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services deficit of 52.0 mln US$.
    • Guyana
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Guyana decreased substantially by 16.6 percent to reach 1.1 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 6.5 percent to reach 1.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 597.4 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Latin America and the Caribbean at -392.1 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Guyana were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Guyana decreased substantially by 44.7 percent, reaching 164.7 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 4.9 percent and reached 500.3 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 335.7 mln US$.
    • Honduras
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Honduras decreased substantially by 22.3 percent to reach 3.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 0.9 percent to reach 8.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 4.9 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -2.1 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Honduras were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were also moderately concentrated. The top 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Honduras increased moderately by 6.5 percent, reaching 1.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 8.4 percent and reached 1.6 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 504.0 mln US$.
    • Hungary
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Hungary increased slightly by 4.6 percent to reach 107.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 4.7 percent to reach 98.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 9.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 9.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Hungary were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 16 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Hungary increased substantially by 10.8 percent, reaching 22.6 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 7.4 percent and reached 17.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 5.4 bln US$.
    • Iceland
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Iceland increased slightly by 0.5 percent to reach 5.0 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 6.7 percent to reach 5.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 334.8 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 521.1 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Iceland were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Iceland increased slightly by 1.3 percent, reaching 3.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 7.1 percent and reached 2.8 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 210.4 mln US$.
    • India
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of India decreased moderately by 5.7 percent to reach 317.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 1.4 percent to reach 459.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). After a reduction in the merchandise trade deficit in 2013, the deficit increased to 141.8 bln US$ in 2014, mainly as a result of decreasing exports (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at -50.1 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in India were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 31 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 24 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of India increased slightly by 2.1 percent, reaching 148.6 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 2.0 percent and reached 78.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). The trade in services surplus increased for the fourth consecutive year, resulting in a large surplus of 70.3 bln US$.
    • Indonesia
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Indonesia decreased slightly by 3.9 percent to reach 182.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 2.6 percent to reach 186.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 4.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG South-eastern Asia at -13.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Indonesia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Indonesia decreased slightly by 3.3 percent, reaching 22.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.9 percent and reached 34.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 12.1 bln US$. See footnote*.
    • Iran (islamic republic of)
      In 2011, the value of merchandise exports of the Islamic Republic of Iran increased substantially by 55.8 percent to reach 130.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 24.9 percent to reach 68.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large surplus of 62.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at 55.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Islamic Republic of Iran were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of the Islamic Republic of Iran decreased substantially by 22.4 percent, reaching 6.7 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased substantially by 23.9 percent and reached 13.0 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 6.3 bln US$.
    • Ireland
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Ireland increased slightly by 2.6 percent to reach 118.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 7.7 percent to reach 71.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate surplus of 47.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 24.6 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Ireland were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Ireland increased moderately by 9.7 percent, reaching 127.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 13.4 percent and reached 127.0 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 322.7 mln US$.
    • Israel
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Israel increased slightly by 3.3 percent to reach 69.0 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 0.5 percent to reach 72.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 3.4 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at 10.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Israel were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Israel increased substantially by 12.7 percent, reaching 30.9 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.5 percent and reached 21.0 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 9.8 bln US$.
    • Italy
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Italy increased slightly by 2.0 percent to reach 528.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 1.6 percent to reach 471.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). Despite growth since 2009, the value of exports was still less than its peak in 2008 at 541.8 bln US$. The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 56.7 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 31.6 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Italy were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 29 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 26 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Italy increased substantially by 10.1 percent, reaching 115.8 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 6.3 percent and reached 112.8 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 3.0 bln US$, the first trade in services surplus since 2004.
    • Jamaica
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Jamaica decreased moderately by 7.5 percent to reach 1.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 6.1 percent to reach 5.8 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 4.4 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Latin America and the Caribbean at -1.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Jamaica were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were also moderately concentrated. The top 8 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Jamaica decreased slightly by 1.1 percent, reaching 2.7 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 5.0 percent and reached 2.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 598.4 mln US$.
    • Japan
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Japan decreased slightly by 4.4 percent to reach 683.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 1.3 percent to reach 822.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). In spite of yen depreciation in 2014, Japan's trade deficit continued to increase and reached 138.4 bln US$ in 2014, mainly due lower exports in manufactured goods (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at -114.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Japan were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 16 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Japan increased slightly by 0.8 percent, reaching 146.7 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 8.2 percent and reached 162.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services deficit of 15.6 bln US$.
    • Jordan
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Jordan increased moderately by 5.9 percent to reach 8.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 5.5 percent to reach 22.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 14.4 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -4.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Jordan were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 19 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Jordan decreased slightly by 1.0 percent, reaching 6.4 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 0.7 percent and reached 4.6 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 1.8 bln US$.
    • Kazakhstan
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Kazakhstan decreased moderately by 5.2 percent to reach 78.2 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 15.7 percent to reach 41.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large surplus of 37.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 37.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Kazakhstan were diversified amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Kazakhstan increased moderately by 9.2 percent, reaching 5.3 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 5.0 percent and reached 12.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 6.8 bln US$.
    • Kenya
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Kenya was 5.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports were 16.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 10.9 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Southern Asia at -2.6 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Kenya were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 21 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Kenya increased slightly by 1.4 percent, reaching 4.8 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 5.5 percent and reached 2.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 2.6 bln US$.
    • Kiribati
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Kiribati increased substantially by 14.8 percent to reach 6.7 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 10.5 percent to reach 97.1 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 90.4 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Asia-Pacific at -41.9 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Kiribati were diversified amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2009, the value of exports of services of Kiribati decreased moderately by 7.0 percent, reaching 4.8 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased substantially by 14.2 percent and reached 50.0 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 45.2 mln US$.
    • Korea, republic of
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of the Republic of Korea increased slightly by 2.1 percent to reach 559.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 0.8 percent to reach 515.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 44.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at -90.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Republic of Korea were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 20 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of the Republic of Korea increased substantially by 16.4 percent, reaching 110.9 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 7.0 percent and reached 108.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 2.7 bln US$.
    • Kuwait
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Kuwait reached 114.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports reached 29.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large surplus of 84.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -7.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Kuwait were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. One partner accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Kuwait increased slightly by 1.6 percent, reaching 10.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 9.8 percent and reached 19.6 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 9.6 bln US$.
    • Kyrgyzstan
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Kyrgyzstan increased moderately by 5.3 percent to reach 1.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 11.3 percent to reach 6.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 4.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG CIS at -2.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Kyrgyzstan were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were also moderately concentrated. The top 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Kyrgyzstan increased substantially by 10.9 percent, reaching 1.4 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased substantially by 13.9 percent and reached 1.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 45.3 mln US$.
    • Latvia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Latvia increased slightly by 1.9 percent to reach 13.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 0.4 percent to reach 16.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 3.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -3.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Latvia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Latvia increased substantially by 14.2 percent, reaching 5.2 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 8.0 percent and reached 2.8 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 2.4 bln US$.
    • Lebanon
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Lebanon decreased substantially by 11.5 percent to reach 3.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 0.4 percent to reach 21.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 17.3 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -8.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Lebanon were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 21 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 22 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Lebanon decreased substantially by 10.4 percent, reaching 14.7 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 10.6 percent and reached 13.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 1.6 bln US$.
    • Lesotho
      In 2012, the value of merchandise exports of Lesotho decreased substantially by 11.9 percent to reach 678.2 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 9.2 percent to reach 1.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 916.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Sub-Saharan Africa at -1.1 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Lesotho were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 1 partner accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Lesotho increased substantially by 41.3 percent, reaching 63.5 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 6.1 percent and reached 174.9 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 111.4 mln US$.
    • Libya
      In 2010, the value of merchandise exports of Libya increased substantially by 33.7 percent to reach 36.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 37.4 percent to reach 17.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large surplus of 18.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 22.5 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Libya were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Libya remained at 410.1 mln US$, while its imports of services remained at 6.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 5.7 bln US$.
    • Lithuania
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Lithuania decreased slightly by 0.6 percent to reach 32.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 1.2 percent to reach 35.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 2.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -4.1 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Lithuania were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Lithuania increased substantially by 25.8 percent, reaching 7.4 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 27.0 percent and reached 5.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 1.9 bln US$.
    • Luxembourg
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Luxembourg increased moderately by 6.8 percent to reach 14.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 0.5 percent to reach 23.8 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 9.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -7.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Luxembourg were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Luxembourg increased substantially by 22.8 percent, reaching 88.7 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 44.0 percent and reached 60.8 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 27.9 bln US$.
    • Madagascar
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Madagascar increased substantially by 50.1 percent to reach 1.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased by 16.0 percent to reach 3.1 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 1.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at -841.6 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Madagascar were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Madagascar increased substantially by 58.2 percent, reaching 2.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 8.9 percent and reached 1.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 648.6 mln US$.
    • Malawi
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Malawi was 1.2 bln US$, while its merchandise imports were 2.8 bln US$ (see graph 1 and tables 2 & 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively large deficit of 1.6 bln US$ (see graph 1). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 1.6 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Sub-Saharan Africa at -954.1 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Malawi were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Malawi increased by 19.3 percent, reaching 136.6 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 71.0 percent and reached 396.6 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively large trade in services deficit of 260.0 mln US$.
    • Malaysia
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Malaysia increased slightly by 0.4 percent to reach 228.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 4.9 percent to reach 205.8 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 22.5 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Asia-Pacific at 11.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Malaysia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Malaysia increased moderately by 5.4 percent, reaching 37.9 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 9.4 percent and reached 42.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services deficit of 4.3 bln US$.
    • Maldives
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Maldives decreased substantially by 13.0 percent to reach 144.8 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 15.0 percent to reach 2.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 1.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at -578.2 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Maldives were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 8 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Maldives increased substantially by 18.9 percent, reaching 2.5 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 13.4 percent and reached 652.5 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 1.9 bln US$. See footnote*.
    • Mali
      In 2012, the value of merchandise exports of Mali increased moderately by 9.9 percent to reach 2.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 3.3 percent to reach 3.5 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 852.3 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -264.8 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Mali were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Mali decreased moderately by 9.2 percent, reaching 352.2 mln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.0 percent and reached 1.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 734.4 mln US$.
    • Malta
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Malta decreased slightly by 4.5 percent to reach 5.0 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 12.2 percent to reach 8.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 3.5 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -3.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Malta were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 19 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Malta increased slightly by 3.3 percent, reaching 5.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.8 percent and reached 3.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 1.9 bln US$.
    • Mauritania
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Mauritania decreased substantially by 13.1 percent to reach 2.1 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 8.5 percent to reach 3.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 1.5 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -870.7 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Mauritania were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 8 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Mauritania increased substantially by 15.8 percent, reaching 186.3 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 2.3 percent and reached 1.0 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 815.0 mln US$.
    • Mauritius
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Mauritius increased substantially by 13.6 percent to reach 2.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 3.9 percent to reach 5.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 2.9 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Southern Asia at -1.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Mauritius were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Mauritius increased slightly by 0.4 percent, reaching 3.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 11.2 percent and reached 2.6 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 674.2 mln US$.
    • Mexico
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Mexico increased slightly by 4.6 percent to reach 397.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 4.9 percent to reach 400.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). Mexico's trade with its largest partner, the United States, increased for both exports and imports, increasing by 6.5 and 4.3 percent respectively in 2014. The overall merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 2.5 bln US$ (see graph 1). Mexico recorded a merchandise trade surplus of 123.3 bln US$ with the United States, a 10.0 percent increase compared to the surplus with the United States in 2013. The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at 124.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Mexico were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 1 partner accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Mexico increased substantially by 24.6 percent, reaching 20.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 4.8 percent and reached 31.9 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 11.8 bln US$ in 2013, which was a 17.5 percent decrease compared to the deficit recorded in 2012.
    • Micronesia (federated states of)
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Micronesia (Federated states of) decreased substantially by 38.7 percent to reach 27.6 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 3.1 percent to reach 187.7 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 160.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -68.6 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Micronesia (Federated states of) were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2008, the value of exports of services of Micronesia (Federated states of) increased moderately by 7.3 percent, reaching 26.3 mln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 7.9 percent and reached 64.1 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 37.8 mln US$.
    • Mongolia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Mongolia increased substantially by 35.3 percent to reach 5.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 19.3 percent to reach 5.1 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 642.9 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at 3.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Mongolia were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 1 partner accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Mongolia decreased substantially by 26.1 percent, reaching 710.0 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 1.8 percent and reached 2.0 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 1.3 bln US$.
    • Montenegro
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Montenegro decreased moderately by 9.7 percent to reach 446.5 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 0.5 percent to reach 2.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 1.9 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -898.7 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Montenegro were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 9 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Montenegro increased moderately by 9.6 percent, reaching 1.4 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 10.2 percent and reached 545.6 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 858.8 mln US$.
    • Montserrat
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Montserrat increased substantially by 232.9 percent to reach 6.0 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 13.9 percent to reach 42.1 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 36.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -28.7 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Montserrat were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 3 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 3 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Montserrat increased substantially by 11.2 percent, reaching 13.3 mln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 1.4 percent and reached 18.2 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 4.9 mln US$.
    • Morocco
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Morocco increased slightly by 2.6 percent to reach 22.0 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 0.9 percent to reach 45.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 23.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -8.9 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Morocco were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Morocco increased moderately by 6.2 percent, reaching 13.8 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 3.9 percent and reached 8.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 5.5 bln US$.
    • Mozambique
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Mozambique increased substantially by 17.4 percent to reach 4.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 13.4 percent to reach 8.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 4.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Sub-Saharan Africa at -1.9 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Mozambique were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Mozambique increased substantially by 50.9 percent, reaching 1.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 92.7 percent and reached 4.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 3.1 bln US$.
    • Myanmar
      In 2010, the value of merchandise exports of Myanmar was 7.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports were 4.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate surplus of 3.5 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG South-eastern Asia at 1.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Myanmar were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were also moderately concentrated. The top 4 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2011, the value of exports of services of Myanmar increased substantially by 68.6 percent, reaching 612.0 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 38.2 percent and reached 1.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 478.2 mln US$.
    • Namibia
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Namibia increased substantially by 17.9 percent to reach 6.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 6.2 percent to reach 7.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 1.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Sub-Saharan Africa at -1.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Namibia were diversified amongst partners; imports were highly concentrated. The top 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Namibia decreased substantially by 15.8 percent, reaching 570.3 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 15.4 percent and reached 804.8 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 234.5 mln US$.
    • Nepal
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Nepal decreased slightly by 0.9 percent to reach 863.3 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 7.2 percent to reach 6.5 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 5.6 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Southern Asia at -3.5 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Nepal were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 4 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 4 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Nepal increased substantially by 27.8 percent, reaching 1.2 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 9.1 percent and reached 978.0 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 204.2 mln US$. See footnote*.
    • Netherlands
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of the Netherlands increased slightly by 0.6 percent to reach 574.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 0.4 percent to reach 508.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). In 2014, both merchandise exports and imports were higher than the level before the financial crisis in 2008.The merchandise trade balance recorded a surplus of 66.0 bln US$, the largest surplus the country has ever recorded (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 142.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Netherlands were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 20 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 20 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of the Netherlands increased substantially by 39.3 percent, reaching 185.9 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 30.9 percent and reached 157.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 28.5 bln US$.
    • New Caledonia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of New Caledonia increased substantially by 30.8 percent to reach 1.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 2.4 percent to reach 3.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 1.7 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -899.5 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in New Caledonia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2011, the value of exports of services of New Caledonia increased slightly by 2.3 percent, reaching 497.7 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 1.2 percent and reached 1.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 876.0 mln US$.
    • New Zealand
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of New Zealand increased moderately by 5.6 percent to reach 41.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 7.3 percent to reach 42.5 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 862.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -3.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in New Zealand were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 19 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of New Zealand increased slightly by 0.9 percent, reaching 13.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.6 percent and reached 12.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 999.0 mln US$.
    • Nicaragua
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Nicaragua increased moderately by 8.3 percent to reach 5.0 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 4.5 percent to reach 5.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 772.9 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at 1.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Nicaragua were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Nicaragua increased slightly by 0.7 percent, reaching 731.4 mln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 1.3 percent and reached 933.8 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 202.4 mln US$.
    • Niger
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of the Niger decreased substantially by 21.5 percent to reach 1.0 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 25.5 percent to reach 2.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 1.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -440.1 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Niger were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of the Niger increased moderately by 8.4 percent, reaching 75.1 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 5.1 percent and reached 826.1 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 751.0 mln US$.
    • Nigeria
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Nigeria decreased substantially by 36.7 percent to reach 90.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 24.3 percent to reach 44.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large surplus of 46.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 24.1 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Nigeria were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Nigeria decreased substantially by 29.1 percent, reaching 2.4 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 2.6 percent and reached 24.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 21.7 bln US$.
    • Norway, including Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Norway decreased moderately by 7.5 percent to reach 142.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 0.7 percent to reach 89.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate surplus of 53.7 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 60.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Norway were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Norway increased slightly by 1.5 percent, reaching 42.9 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.9 percent and reached 48.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services deficit of 5.6 bln US$.
    • Oman
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Oman increased moderately by 6.4 percent to reach 55.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 22.1 percent to reach 34.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate surplus of 21.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at -5.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Oman were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Oman increased substantially by 33.8 percent, reaching 2.9 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 22.9 percent and reached 8.7 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 5.8 bln US$.
    • Pakistan
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Pakistan decreased slightly by 1.6 percent to reach 24.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 8.6 percent to reach 47.5 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 22.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at -13.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Pakistan were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 24 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Pakistan decreased substantially by 25.8 percent, reaching 4.9 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 7.0 percent and reached 7.8 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 2.9 bln US$.
    • Panama
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Panama decreased slightly by 3.0 percent to reach 818.2 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 5.2 percent to reach 13.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 12.9 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -3.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Panama were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Panama increased slightly by 4.5 percent, reaching 9.8 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 12.7 percent and reached 4.7 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 5.1 bln US$. See footnote*.
    • Papua New Guinea
      In 2012, the value of merchandise exports of Papua New Guinea decreased substantially by 17.9 percent to reach 4.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 36.6 percent to reach 8.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 3.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG South-eastern Asia at -1.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Papua New Guinea were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were also moderately concentrated. The top 9 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 8 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Papua New Guinea increased substantially by 12.4 percent, reaching 476.9 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 25.9 percent and reached 3.7 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 3.3 bln US$.
    • Paraguay
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Paraguay increased slightly by 2.4 percent to reach 9.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 0.2 percent to reach 12.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 2.5 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -3.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Paraguay were diversified amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Paraguay increased substantially by 11.4 percent, reaching 842.2 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 15.4 percent and reached 1.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 227.4 mln US$.
    • Peru
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Peru decreased moderately by 8.9 percent to reach 41.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 2.6 percent to reach 43.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 1.5 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 4.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Peru were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Peru increased substantially by 17.5 percent, reaching 5.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 13.7 percent and reached 7.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 2.3 bln US$.
    • Philippines
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of the Philippines increased moderately by 9.0 percent to reach 61.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 3.1 percent to reach 67.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 5.9 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Asia-Pacific at 8.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Philippines were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 9 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of the Philippines increased substantially by 19.9 percent, reaching 21.7 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 1.6 percent and reached 14.6 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 7.1 bln US$.
    • Poland
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Poland increased moderately by 5.2 percent to reach 214.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 5.4 percent to reach 216.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 2.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 37.9 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Poland were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Poland increased substantially by 19.5 percent, reaching 45.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 7.0 percent and reached 34.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 11.1 bln US$.
    • Portugal
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Portugal increased slightly by 2.0 percent to reach 64.0 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 3.2 percent to reach 78.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 14.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -13.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Portugal were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Portugal increased substantially by 20.0 percent, reaching 29.5 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 6.3 percent and reached 14.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 15.2 bln US$.
    • Qatar
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Qatar increased slightly by 2.3 percent to reach 136.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 12.2 percent to reach 27.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large surplus of 109.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Asia-Pacific at 38.6 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Qatar were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 8 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Qatar increased substantially by 12.6 percent, reaching 11.2 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 14.9 percent and reached 27.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 16.3 bln US$.
    • Republic of Moldova
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of the Republic of Moldova decreased slightly by 3.7 percent to reach 2.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 3.2 percent to reach 5.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 3.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -926.2 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Republic of Moldova were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of the Republic of Moldova increased moderately by 6.2 percent, reaching 936.3 mln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 8.3 percent and reached 957.4 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services deficit of 21.1 mln US$.
    • Romania
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Romania increased moderately by 6.1 percent to reach 69.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 6.0 percent to reach 77.9 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 8.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -8.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Romania were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 20 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Romania increased substantially by 67.7 percent, reaching 18.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 21.7 percent and reached 11.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 6.8 bln US$.
    • Russian federation
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of the Russian Federation increased slightly by 0.5 percent to reach 527.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 0.4 percent to reach 314.9 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate surplus of 212.3 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 109.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Russian Federation were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 21 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 21 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of the Russian Federation increased substantially by 13.0 percent, reaching 66.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 17.9 percent and reached 126.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 60.4 bln US$.
    • Rwanda
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Rwanda increased substantially by 22.7 percent to reach 620.5 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 4.8 percent to reach 1.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 1.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -315.7 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Rwanda were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 4 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Rwanda increased substantially by 18.1 percent, reaching 502.2 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 22.1 percent and reached 633.3 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 131.1 mln US$.
    • Saint Kitts and Nevis
      In 2011, the value of merchandise exports of Saint Kitts and Nevis increased substantially by 40.2 percent to reach 44.9 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 8.6 percent to reach 246.7 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 201.8 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -134.8 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Saint Kitts and Nevis were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. One partner accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 4 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Saint Kitts and Nevis increased substantially by 12.2 percent, reaching 194.3 mln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 3.7 percent and reached 119.6 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 74.7 mln US$.
    • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
      In 2012, the value of merchandise exports of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines increased substantially by 12.0 percent to reach 43.0 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 5.2 percent to reach 403.2 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 360.2 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Latin America and the Caribbean at -148.3 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines were moderately diversified amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines increased slightly by 0.9 percent, reaching 140.6 mln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 3.3 percent and reached 87.1 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 53.5 mln US$.
    • Samoa
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Samoa decreased substantially by 18.0 percent to reach 50.9 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 5.8 percent to reach 388.0 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 337.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG South-eastern Asia at -119.2 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Samoa were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 3 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Samoa increased substantially by 12.8 percent, reaching 193.0 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 28.8 percent and reached 100.2 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 92.8 mln US$.
    • Sao Tome and Principe
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Sao Tome and Principe increased substantially by 51.3 percent to reach 10.5 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 11.6 percent to reach 169.7 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 159.2 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -103.7 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Sao Tome and Principe were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were highly concentrated. The top 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Sao Tome and Principe decreased slightly by 4.4 percent, reaching 17.6 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased substantially by 19.5 percent and reached 25.3 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 7.7 mln US$.
    • Saudi Arabia
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Saudi Arabia decreased slightly by 3.3 percent to reach 375.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 5.2 percent to reach 163.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large surplus of 211.7 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at 176.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Saudi Arabia were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 4 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 22 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Saudi Arabia increased moderately by 5.7 percent, reaching 11.7 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 4.4 percent and reached 76.7 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 65.0 bln US$. See footnote*.
    • Senegal
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Senegal increased moderately by 5.3 percent to reach 2.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 3.5 percent to reach 6.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 4.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -2.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Senegal were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Senegal increased slightly by 4.2 percent, reaching 1.2 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.4 percent and reached 1.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services deficit of 107.1 mln US$.
    • Serbia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Serbia increased slightly by 1.6 percent to reach 14.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 0.3 percent to reach 20.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 5.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -3.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Serbia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Serbia decreased moderately by 6.7 percent, reaching 3.3 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 5.7 percent and reached 3.0 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 240.8 mln US$. See footnote*.
    • Singapore
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Singapore increased slightly by 0.5 percent to reach 410.2 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 1.8 percent to reach 373.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 37.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG South-eastern Asia at 50.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Singapore were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Singapore increased slightly by 3.7 percent, reaching 130.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 3.8 percent and reached 129.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 776.5 mln US$.
    • Slovakia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Slovakia increased slightly by 0.8 percent to reach 85.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 4.6 percent to reach 77.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 8.3 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 20.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Slovakia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and the same number of partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Slovakia increased slightly by 3.9 percent, reaching 7.4 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 7.1 percent and reached 7.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 197.9 mln US$.
    • Slovenia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Slovenia increased moderately by 7.1 percent to reach 30.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 2.8 percent to reach 30.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 485.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -2.5 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Slovenia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 16 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Slovenia increased moderately by 8.4 percent, reaching 7.2 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 10.4 percent and reached 4.8 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 2.4 bln US$.
    • Solomon Islands
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Solomon Islands decreased moderately by 6.3 percent to reach 458.5 mln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 13.9 percent to reach 499.6 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 41.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at 205.2 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Solomon Islands were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 4 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Solomon Islands increased slightly by 4.8 percent, reaching 124.8 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 30.8 percent and reached 265.8 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively large trade in services deficit of 141.0 mln US$.
    • South Africa
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of South Africa decreased slightly by 4.7 percent to reach 90.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 3.4 percent to reach 99.9 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 9.3 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Sub-Saharan Africa at 14.1 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in South Africa were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 24 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 23 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of South Africa decreased moderately by 6.5 percent, reaching 14.2 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 7.2 percent and reached 16.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services deficit of 2.2 bln US$.
    • Spain
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Spain increased slightly by 2.5 percent to reach 318.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 5.6 percent to reach 351.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 32.3 bln US$ (see graph 1), which reversed positive growth trends in net exports in recent years. The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -19.4 bln US$ (see graph 4), consisting mostly electrical equipment, machineries, and articles of apparel. Merchandise exports in Spain were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 23 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 26 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Spain increased moderately by 5.4 percent, reaching 145.2 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 0.7 percent and reached 90.9 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 54.3 bln US$.
    • Sri Lanka
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Sri Lanka increased substantially by 12.9 percent to reach 11.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 7.3 percent to reach 19.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 7.9 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -4.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Sri Lanka were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 21 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Sri Lanka increased substantially by 23.3 percent, reaching 4.7 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 38.1 percent and reached 3.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 1.2 bln US$.
    • State of Palestine
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of the State of Palestine increased substantially by 15.1 percent to reach 900.6 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased moderately by 9.9 percent to reach 5.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 4.3 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at -3.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the State of Palestine were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 1 partner accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 3 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of the State of Palestine decreased slightly by 1.9 percent, reaching 936.1 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 13.1 percent and reached 1.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 260.3 mln US$.
    • Sudan
      In 2012, the value of merchandise exports of the Sudan decreased substantially by 62.3 percent to reach 3.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 31.1 percent to reach 6.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 3.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -1.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Sudan were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 3 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 19 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of the Sudan increased substantially by 19.2 percent, reaching 1.3 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 9.2 percent and reached 1.8 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 542.7 mln US$. See footnote*.
    • Suriname
      In 2011, the value of merchandise exports of Suriname increased substantially by 21.8 percent to reach 2.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 17.2 percent to reach 1.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate surplus of 829.0 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at 638.1 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Suriname were diversified amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Suriname increased slightly by 1.8 percent, reaching 178.5 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 8.9 percent and reached 541.5 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 363.0 mln US$.
    • Sweden
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Sweden decreased slightly by 1.8 percent to reach 164.5 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 1.2 percent to reach 162.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 1.9 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -13.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Sweden were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 20 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Sweden increased slightly by 0.1 percent, reaching 71.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 0.2 percent and reached 54.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 16.6 bln US$.
    • Switzerland-Liechtenstein
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Switzerland increased slightly by 4.2 percent to reach 238.8 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 0.9 percent to reach 202.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 36.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at 20.6 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Switzerland were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Switzerland decreased slightly by 4.4 percent, reaching 90.8 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 3.6 percent and reached 46.9 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 43.9 bln US$.
    • Syrian Arab republic
      In 2010, the value of merchandise exports of the Syrian Arab Republic increased substantially by 17.1 percent to reach 11.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 13.7 percent to reach 17.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 6.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -2.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Syrian Arab Republic were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 22 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2010, the value of exports of services of the Syrian Arab Republic increased substantially by 52.8 percent, reaching 7.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 23.2 percent and reached 3.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 3.8 bln US$.
    • Thailand
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Thailand decreased slightly by 0.4 percent to reach 227.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 9.1 percent to reach 227.9 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 358.7 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at -18.1 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Thailand were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 20 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Thailand increased substantially by 19.1 percent, reaching 59.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 4.2 percent and reached 55.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 3.8 bln US$.
    • The former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia increased substantially by 15.6 percent to reach 4.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 10.3 percent to reach 7.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 2.3 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -697.9 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 11 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia increased substantially by 10.5 percent, reaching 1.2 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 6.4 percent and reached 1.1 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 103.0 mln US$.
    • Togo
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Togo increased substantially by 11.3 percent to reach 1.0 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 20.2 percent to reach 2.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 999.9 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -552.5 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Togo were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 22 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Togo decreased substantially by 15.9 percent, reaching 428.0 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased moderately by 7.1 percent and reached 440.0 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services deficit of 12.0 mln US$.
    • Tonga
      In 2012, the value of merchandise exports of Tonga increased moderately by 8.3 percent to reach 15.6 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 3.2 percent to reach 199.2 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 183.6 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Asia-Pacific at -73.6 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Tonga were diversified amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 6 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2009, the value of exports of services of Tonga decreased slightly by 2.2 percent, reaching 34.8 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased substantially by 13.2 percent and reached 47.0 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 12.1 mln US$.
    • Trinidad and Tobago
      In 2010, the value of merchandise exports of Trinidad and Tobago increased substantially by 20.3 percent to reach 11.0 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 6.8 percent to reach 6.5 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate surplus of 4.5 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at 3.5 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Trinidad and Tobago were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2010, the value of exports of services of Trinidad and Tobago increased substantially by 14.3 percent, reaching 874.2 mln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 0.9 percent and reached 386.6 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 487.6 mln US$.
    • Tunisia
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Tunisia increased slightly by 0.3 percent to reach 17.1 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 0.8 percent to reach 24.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 7.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -1.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Tunisia were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Tunisia increased moderately by 9.9 percent, reaching 5.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 0.4 percent and reached 3.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 2.0 bln US$.
    • Turkey
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Turkey increased slightly by 3.9 percent to reach 157.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 3.7 percent to reach 242.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 84.5 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -30.6 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Turkey were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 31 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 23 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Turkey increased moderately by 6.6 percent, reaching 43.8 bln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 0.3 percent and reached 20.9 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 22.9 bln US$.
    • Turks and Caicos Islands
      In 2012, the value of merchandise exports of the Turks and Caicos Islands increased substantially by 38.6 percent to reach 11.8 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 3.2 percent to reach 268.5 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 256.7 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed North America at -191.5 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Turks and Caicos Islands were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were also highly concentrated. The top 1 partner accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). No trade in services data is available.
    • Uganda
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Uganda decreased moderately by 6.1 percent to reach 2.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 4.4 percent to reach 6.1 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 3.8 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Southern Asia at -1.6 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Uganda were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 15 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Uganda increased slightly by 2.2 percent, reaching 2.2 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 8.7 percent and reached 2.7 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 501.7 mln US$.
    • Ukraine
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Ukraine decreased substantially by 14.9 percent to reach 53.9 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 29.4 percent to reach 54.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small deficit of 468.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at 5.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Ukraine were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 27 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Ukraine increased moderately by 9.1 percent, reaching 14.8 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 13.0 percent and reached 7.6 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 7.2 bln US$.
    • United Arab Emirates
      In 2011, the value of merchandise exports of the United Arab Emirates increased substantially by 27.3 percent to reach 252.6 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 16.7 percent to reach 210.9 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 41.6 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at 76.0 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the United Arab Emirates were moderately concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of the United Arab Emirates increased substantially by 17.7 percent, reaching 15.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 13.1 percent and reached 63.9 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 48.9 bln US$.
    • United kingdom
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of the United Kingdom decreased moderately by 6.7 percent to reach 511.3 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 4.6 percent to reach 687.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). After a reduction in the merchandise trade deficit in 2013, the deficit increased to 176.0 bln US$ in 2014, as a result of decreased exports and increased imports (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -128.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the United Kingdom were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 21 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 20 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of the United Kingdom increased substantially by 13.8 percent, reaching 332.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 13.1 percent and reached 205.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 126.8 bln US$.
    • United republic of Tanzania
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of the United Republic of Tanzania increased substantially by 29.3 percent to reach 5.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 1.3 percent to reach 12.7 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 7.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at -1.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the United Republic of Tanzania were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 12 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 13 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of the United Republic of Tanzania increased substantially by 14.6 percent, reaching 3.0 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 5.8 percent and reached 2.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services surplus of 520.7 mln US$.
    • United States of America, including Puerto Rico and U.S.V.I.
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of the United States increased slightly by 2.8 percent to reach 1622.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 3.4 percent to reach 2408.1 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). Despite being overtaken by China in 2007 as the largest exporter of merchandise, the United States is still the world?s largest importer. The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 785.4 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -369.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the United States were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 22 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 18 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of the United States increased slightly by 4.8 percent, reaching 671.1 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 2.7 percent and reached 454.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). In recent years, the United States has been the world?s largest exporter and importer of services. There was a trade in services surplus of 216.6 bln US$, which is the largest trade in services surplus recorded.
    • Uruguay
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Uruguay increased slightly by 4.1 percent to reach 9.1 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 0.1 percent to reach 11.6 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a moderate deficit of 2.6 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Latin America and the Caribbean at -1.3 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Uruguay were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Uruguay decreased moderately by 5.6 percent, reaching 3.3 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 39.9 percent and reached 3.4 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a relatively small trade in services deficit of 83.6 mln US$.
    • Vanuatu
      In 2011, the value of merchandise exports of Vanuatu increased substantially by 37.6 percent to reach 63.5 mln US$, while its merchandise imports increased slightly by 1.7 percent to reach 280.6 mln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 217.1 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Asia-Pacific at -108.4 mln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Vanuatu were diversified amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 7 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Vanuatu increased substantially by 10.3 percent, reaching 331.5 mln US$, while its imports of services decreased slightly by 0.3 percent and reached 145.5 mln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services surplus of 185.9 mln US$.
    • Venezuela (Bolivarian republic of)
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela decreased moderately by 7.4 percent to reach 88.0 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 23.9 percent to reach 45.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large surplus of 43.0 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at 19.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 3 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 14 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela increased substantially by 10.6 percent, reaching 2.2 bln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 15.8 percent and reached 18.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 16.0 bln US$. See footnote*.
    • Viet Nam
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Viet Nam increased substantially by 15.3 percent to reach 132.0 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 16.0 percent to reach 132.0 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 0.3 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -41.8 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Viet Nam were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 19 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Viet Nam increased substantially by 10.5 percent, reaching 9.6 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 5.6 percent and reached 12.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 2.9 bln US$. -150
    • Yemen
      In 2013, the value of merchandise exports of Yemen increased slightly by 1.0 percent to reach 7.1 bln US$, while its merchandise imports increased substantially by 17.9 percent to reach 13.3 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 6.1 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Western Asia at -3.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Yemen were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 9 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 17 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2012, the value of exports of services of Yemen increased substantially by 24.4 percent, reaching 1.6 bln US$, while its imports of services increased moderately by 8.1 percent and reached 2.3 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services deficit of 764.2 mln US$.
    • Zambia
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Zambia decreased moderately by 8.6 percent to reach 9.7 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased moderately by 6.1 percent to reach 9.5 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 148.9 mln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Developed Europe at 3.7 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Zambia were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were diversified. The top 5 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 10 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Zambia increased substantially by 25.5 percent, reaching 585.4 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 16.7 percent and reached 1.5 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 880.2 mln US$.
    • Zimbabwe
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of Zimbabwe decreased substantially by 12.6 percent to reach 3.1 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased substantially by 17.2 percent to reach 6.4 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a large deficit of 3.3 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG South-eastern Asia at -1.2 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in Zimbabwe were highly concentrated amongst partners; imports were moderately concentrated. The top 2 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 8 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of Zimbabwe increased substantially by 13.7 percent, reaching 439.9 mln US$, while its imports of services increased substantially by 20.4 percent and reached 1.2 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a large trade in services deficit of 724.9 mln US$.
    • European Union
      In 2014, the value of merchandise exports of the EU decreased slightly by 2.5 percent to reach 2337.4 bln US$, while its merchandise imports decreased slightly by 0.4 percent to reach 2274.2 bln US$ (see graph 1, table 2 and table 3). The merchandise trade balance recorded a relatively small surplus of 63.2 bln US$ (see graph 1). The largest merchandise trade balance was with MDG Eastern Asia at -153.4 bln US$ (see graph 4). Merchandise exports in the EU were diversified amongst partners; imports were also diversified. The top 24 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of exports and 22 partners accounted for 80 percent or more of imports (see graph 5). In 2013, the value of exports of services of the EU increased moderately by 6.9 percent, reaching 908.9 bln US$, while its imports of services increased slightly by 3.9 percent and reached 679.0 bln US$ (see graph 2). There was a moderate trade in services surplus of 230.0 bln US$. See footnote*.
    • General notes
      For further information on Sources, Method of Estimation, Currency Conversion, Period, Country Nomenclature and Country Grouping of this table, as well as for a brief table description, please see the Introduction.
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