UN Chronicle

Frequency
Quarterly
ISSN: 
1564-3913 (online)
DOI: 
10.18356/4db709e5-en
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The UN Chronicle is a must-read for every concerned world citizen. Produced by the United Nations Department of Public Information, this quarterly journal is your connection to the major political and social issues happening around the world today. In each issue, you'll read about international developments on a wide-range of topics including: human rights, economic, social and political issues, peacekeeping operations, international conferences and upcoming events. Every issue contains in-depth reviews and articles written by leading world figures, which provide an insightful look into the world today. The UN Chronicle also includes a review of current United Nations Security Council and General Assembly sessions.
Also available in French
 

Volume 50, Issue 3 You do not have access to this content

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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/1894b8a4-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/united-nations/un-chronicle/volume-50/issue-3_1894b8a4-en
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23 Oct 2013
ISBN:
9789210563598 (PDF)
DOI: 
10.18356/1894b8a4-en
Also available in French

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  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/86a39d97-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/united-nations/lowering-the-costs-and-amplifying-the-benefits-of-migration_86a39d97-en
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Lowering the costs and amplifying the benefits of migration
Peter Sutherland
The evidence is clear: migration contributes more powerfully to development than any other means we know. When states and stakeholders gather in October 2013 at the second High-level Dialogue on Migration and Development, they need to build on this knowledge by committing to concrete actions. If more states work together and make better informed policy choices, they can generate large economic and social gains from migration, while ensuring decent living and working conditions for migrants.
  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/57e51f0e-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/united-nations/protection-of-migrants-rights-and-state-sovereignty_57e51f0e-en
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Protection of migrants’ rights and state sovereignty
Laura Thompson
Paradoxical as it seems, protecting migrants’ rights may be the best way to enhance state sovereignty in a globalized world. The protection of fundamental human rights and freedoms should not depend on where one is in the world. However, it is the state’s responsibility to uphold human rights through its laws and enforcement.
  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/38097f74-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/united-nations/strengthening-partnerships-and-cooperation-on-international-migration_38097f74-en
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Strengthening partnerships and cooperation on international migration
Eva Åkerman Åkerman Börje
Migration forms a natural part of the human condition. It is one of mankind’s oldest strategies for reducing poverty and, on an individual level, has proven to be one of the most direct and effective ways of improving one’s well-being. The 2009 United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Human Development Report highlighted how people migrating from low-income countries to higher income countries on average could gain a 15-fold increase in income, a doubling of the education enrolment rate and a 16-fold reduction in child mortality.
  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/66ef329f-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/united-nations/from-migration-restriction-to-migration-management_66ef329f-en
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From migration restriction to migration management
Douglas S. Massey
Contrary to popular opinion, international migration does not stem from a lack of economic development, but is part and parcel of the development process itself. The principal driver of migration is the globalization of the economy and the worldwide integration of factor markets. As markets for goods, financial capital, information, commodities, and services globalize, so do markets for labour and human capital. We observe the global integration of markets for skilled and unskilled labour as immigration.
  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/60eba1c4-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/united-nations/labour-migration-and-inclusive-development-setting-a-course-for-success_60eba1c4-en
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Labour migration and inclusive development: Setting a course for success
Michelle Leighton
There are over 100 million migrant workers living and working around the globe. Together with their families they represent most of the international migrants now estimated at 232 million people living outside their country of origin. Almost half are women, migrating increasingly for employment. About one in eight are between the ages of 15 and 24. South-South migration has now surpassed South-North migration: more than 50 per cent of emigrants from developing countries move to another developing country, and largely within their region. Nearly 80 per cent of South- South migration is between countries with a common border.
  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/d645d875-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/united-nations/migration-sustainable-development-and-the-role-of-business_d645d875-en
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Migration, sustainable development and the role of business
C. B. Bhattacharya, Ursula Moffitt
Over the past decades, business has begun reacting to growing societal pressures by broadening its focus from profit maximization alone to the “triple bottom line” of people, planet and profit.1 In the years since this concept was first introduced, people and planet focused sustainability initiatives have become standard practice amongst businesses across the world. Yet, migration is often overlooked as a factor within a company’s overall sustainability strategy. Such an oversight is critical, as migration invariably impacts business, and ensuring that its influence remains positive requires both awareness and engagement amongst corporate leadership. Migration can offer opportunities within each aspect of the triple bottom line, for instance, by creating a diverse and competent workforce, fostering innovation across borders and creating possibilities for globally integrated strategies in the realm of environmental sustainability.
  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/b1d84fc4-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/united-nations/leveraging-migration-and-remittances-for-development_b1d84fc4-en
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Leveraging migration and remittances for development
Dilip Ratha
Three notable facts about migration are often drowned in the stringent debate surrounding migration policies. First, the contribution of migrants to their host and home countries is enormous, over $500 billion in remittances alone (of which over $400 billion went to developing countries in 2012). Second, South-South migration is actually larger than South-North migration, implying that not only emigration, but also immigration matters for the developing countries. Third, internal migration is nearly four times the size of international migration and is an integral part of an economy’s structural change and development process. Yet, movement of people is rarely included in the development strategies of countries.
  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/d002f46d-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/united-nations/homeward-bound-questions-on-promoting-the-reintegration-of-returning-migrants_d002f46d-en
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Homeward bound? questions on promoting the reintegration of returning Migrants
Parvati Nair
The idea of return migration, with the aim of assisting voluntary returnees to settle back in their home countries, can seem an attractive way forward for governments that seek to manage migration humanely. In recent years, nevertheless, as return migration has become a preferred strategy for governments and one of the very few options open to migrants, the problems emerging from this practice and the policies that support it have increasingly come into view. Between the priorities of governance and the very complex, multiple and historically determined circumstances in which migration, as a global phenomenon, takes place, the consequences of implementing strategies that can be seen as unifocal become clear. This is evident in the disruption wrought by numerous government interventions that result in measures that counter, contain and displace the needs, aspirations and rights of migrants. Never is this more so than in the case of migration from the Global South to the Global North.
  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/b8aeb997-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/united-nations/china-s-return-migration-and-its-impact-on-home-development_b8aeb997-en
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China’s return migration and its impact on home development
Huiyao Wang
As the world enters a stage of unprecedented globalization and economic interconnectedness, the world labour market has become increasingly competitive. In this era of international competition for talent, the Chinese diaspora is an immeasurably critical factor in helping to realize domestic development objectives, which in turn will alter the future world geopolitical balance.
  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/d06da219-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/united-nations/globalization-of-migration-what-the-modern-world-can-learn-from-nomadic-cultures_d06da219-en
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Globalization of migration: What the modern world can learn from nomadic cultures
Rafis Abazov
Our modern post-industrial societies and economies require that skills, expertise and experience be mobile and easily transferable to various geographic locations both inside and outside the boundaries of nation-states, to the tune of 200 million international migrants and 740 million internal migrants, as estimated by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Innovation and competition, as well as rapid development of information and communication technologies and new media require speedy recruitment, deployment and redeployment of talent into specific, sometimes unpredictable, locations around the world. Yet, pre-industrial and industrial era perceptions, attitudes and social norms continue to build various barriers to population movement, such as concerns about the security of local jobs, cultural compatibility and difficulties with integration into local cultures and societies.
  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/de16c91c-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/united-nations/enrique-s-journey_de16c91c-en
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Enrique’s journey
Sonia Nazario
One day, I was having a conversation in my kitchen with Carmen, who came to clean my house twice a month.
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