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UNODA Occasional Papers No. 34

The Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention - Twenty Years of Saving Lives and Preventing Indiscriminate Harm

image of UNODA Occasional Papers No. 34

This publication describes the achievements and shortfalls of the first twenty years of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction, which entered into force on 1 March 1999. Published with the aim of bringing together diverse perspectives on this key instrument of humanitarian disarmament, the paper was written by pioneers and luminaries of the movement that helped achieve the Convention and that committed themselves towards realizing the Convention’s full implementation. Each chapter contains discussions of an element of the Convention.

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The history of the anti-personnel mine ban convention

The Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention—also known as the Ottawa Convention or, as it is properly known, the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction—was signed by 122 Governments in Ottawa on 3 and 4 December 1997. On 18 September 1997, a diplomatic conference at Oslo had concluded the Convention and Article 15 provided for the opening for signature in Ottawa. On 1 March 1999, Burkina Faso became the fortieth State to ratify the Convention, thus triggering the entry into force after a six-month delay prescribed in the Convention’s terms. After the treaty’s entry into force, States no longer signed the Convention but became bound by their accession; there are currently 164 States parties to the treaty, 1 signatory State that has not ratified and 32 non-signatory States.

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