1887

Resource Book on the Use of Force and Firearms in Law Enforcement

image of Resource Book on the Use of Force and Firearms in Law Enforcement

This resource book explores international law sources relevant to the use of force and the general responsibility of law enforcement authorities for the use of force. It discusses a number of instruments of force, including firearms, and the conditions under which these should be used. It further examines the possible use of force in a number of specific policing situations. Finally, it also outlines good practices for accountability in the use of force and firearms by law enforcement officials.

English

.

Introduction and key concepts and actors

This resource book relates to the use of force and firearms by law enforcement officials. Law enforcement officials’ power to use force derives from the duty of the State to maintain public order, to protect persons within its jurisdiction, and ensure human rights and the rule of law. While the use of force may be lawful and necessary in certain cases, it can result in damage to property, injury, loss of life and may interfere with or violate human rights. Law enforcement officials have the authority to use force in situations where it is necessary in order to achieve a legitimate law enforcement objective. Force may, for example, be used to ensure compliance with lawful police instructions, to arrest non-cooperative or dangerous suspects, protect members of the general public or break up a violent crowd. However, such use of force should always respect a State’s obligations under international law, which include conditions imposed by international human rights law, included in treaties or recognized as customary international law. The United Nations standards and norms on crime prevention and criminal justice, developed and adopted through consensus by the governing bodies of UNODC (the Crime Congress, the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, the United Nations Economic and Social Council and the General Assembly) through an intergovernmental process, provide an important benchmark for measuring the functioning of the criminal justice system, including law enforcement agencies.

English

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error