The Sustainable Development Goals Report

English
Frequency
Annual
ISSN: 
2518-3958 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/d3229fb0-en
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On 1 January 2016, the world officially began the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – the transformative plan of action based on 17 Sustainable Development Goals – to address urgent global challenges over the next 15 years. With the aim to offer an accurate evaluation of where the world stands in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda, the Sustainable Development Goals Report presents an overview of the 17 goals based on a proposed global indicator framework, using data provided by the United Nations and other international agencies. The data and analysis provided in the report highlight the most significant gaps and challenges, so that steps can be taken to reverse these trends.

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The Sustainable Development Goals Report 2016

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English
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Author(s):
DESA
20 July 2016
Pages:
54
ISBN:
9789210582599 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/3405d09f-en

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The Sustainable Development Goals Report 2016 provides the first account of where the world stands at the beginning of our journey towards a sustainable future for people and the planet. This inaugural progress report presents an overview of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, based on a proposed global indicator framework, using data currently available. The data and analysis in the report show us where gaps and challenges are, so that steps can be taken to reverse these trends. With collective global action, we can seize the opportunities before us and, together, ensure the 2030 Agenda leaves no one behind. The report is prepared by the Statistics Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs, based on the data and information provided by UN and other international agencies. Printed copies are expected in late August.
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  • Foreword
    On 1 January 2016, the world officially began implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development—the transformative plan of action based on 17 Sustainable Development Goals—to address urgent global challenges over the next 15 years.
  • Overview
    This inaugural report on the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is a first accounting of where the world stands at the start of our collective journey to 2030. The report analyses selected indicators from the global indicator framework for which data are available as examples to highlight some critical gaps and challenges. The list of SDG indicators agreed upon by the UN Statistical Commission in March 2016 will be subject to refinements and improvements as methods and data availability improve.
  • No poverty
    In signing Agenda 2030, Governments around the world committed to ending poverty in all its manifestations, including its most extreme forms, over the next 15 years. They resolved that all people everywhere should enjoy a basic standard of living. This includes social protection benefits for the poor and most vulnerable and ensuring that people harmed by conflict and natural hazards receive adequate support, including access to basic services.
  • Zero hunger
    Goal 2 seeks sustainable solutions to end hunger in all its forms by 2030 and to achieve food security. The aim is to ensure that everyone everywhere has enough good-quality food to lead a healthy life. Achieving this Goal will require better access to food and the widespread promotion of sustainable agriculture. This entails improving the productivity and incomes of small-scale farmers by promoting equal access to land, technology and markets, sustainable food production systems and resilient agricultural practices. It also requires increased investments through international cooperation to bolster the productive capacity of agriculture in developing countries.
  • Good health and well-being
    Goal 3 seeks to ensure health and well-being for all at every stage of life. The aim is to improve reproductive and maternal and child health; end the epidemics of HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and neglected tropical diseases; reduce non-communicable and environmental diseases; achieve universal health coverage; and ensure universal access to safe, affordable and effective medicines and vaccines. Towards that end, world leaders committed to support research and development, increase health financing, and strengthen the capacity of all countries to reduce and manage health risks.
  • Quality education
    Goal 4 aims to ensure that all people have access to quality education and lifelong learning opportunities. This Goal focuses on the acquisition of foundational and higher-order skills at all stages of education and development; greater and more equitable access to quality education at all levels, as well as technical and vocational education and training (TVET); and the knowledge, skills and values needed to function well and contribute to society.
  • Gender equality
    Empowering women and girls to reach their full potential requires that they have equal opportunities to those of men and boys. This means eliminating all forms of discrimination and violence against them, including violence by intimate partners, sexual violence and harmful practices, such as child marriage and female genital mutilation (FGM). Ensuring that women have better access to paid employment, sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights, and real decision-making power in public and private spheres will further ensure that development is equitable and sustainable.
  • Clean water and sanitation
    Sustainable Development Goal 6 goes beyond drinking water, sanitation and hygiene to also address the quality and sustainability of water resources, which are critical to the survival of people and the planet. The 2030 Agenda recognizes the centrality of water resources to sustainable development and the vital role that improved drinking water, sanitation and hygiene play in progress in other areas, including health, education and poverty reduction.
  • Affordable and clean energy
    Access to affordable, reliable and sustainable energy is crucial to achieving many of the Sustainable Development Goals—from poverty eradication through advancements in health, education, water supply and industrialization to mitigating climate change. Energy access, however, varies widely across countries, and the current rate of progress falls short of what will be required to achieve this Goal. Redoubled efforts will be needed, particularly for countries with large energy access deficits and high energy consumption.
  • Decent work and economic growth
    Sustained and inclusive economic growth is a prerequisite for sustainable development, which can contribute to improved livelihoods for people around the world. Economic growth can lead to new and better employment opportunities and provide greater economic security for all. Moreover, rapid growth, especially among the least developed and developing countries, can help them reduce the wage gap relative to developed countries, thereby diminishing glaring inequalities between the rich and poor.
  • Industry, innovation and infrastructure
    Sustainable Development Goal 9 addresses three important aspects of sustainable development: infrastructure, industrialization and innovation. Infrastructure provides the basic physical facilities essential to business and society; industrialization drives economic growth and job creation, thereby reducing income inequality; and innovation expands the technological capabilities of industrial sectors and leads to the development of new skills.
  • Reduce inequalities
    Goal 10 calls for reducing inequalities in income, as well as those based on sex, age, disability, race, class, ethnicity, religion and opportunity—both within and among countries. World leaders recognized the positive contribution of international migration to inclusive growth and sustainable development, while acknowledging that it demands coherent and comprehensive responses. Accordingly, they committed to cooperate internationally to ensure safe, orderly and regular migration. The Goal also addresses issues related to representation of developing countries in global decision-making and development assistance.
  • Sustainable cities and communities
    Today, more than half the world’s population live in cities. By 2030, it is projected that 6 in 10 people will be urban dwellers. Despite numerous planning challenges, cities offer more efficient economies of scale on many levels, including the provision of goods, services and transportation. With sound, risk-informed planning and management, cities can become incubators for innovation and growth and drivers of sustainable development.
  • Responsible consumption and production
    Sustainable growth and development requires minimizing the natural resources and toxic materials used, and the waste and pollutants generated, throughout the entire production and consumption process. Sustainable Development Goal 12 encourages more sustainable consumption and production patterns through various measures, including specific policies and international agreements on the management of materials that are toxic to the environment.
  • Climate action
    Climate change presents the single biggest threat to development, and its widespread, unprecedented effects disproportionately burden the poorest and the most vulnerable. Goal 13 calls for urgent action not only to combat climate change and its impacts, but also to build resilience in responding to climate-related hazards and natural disasters.
  • Life below water
    Oceans, seas and other marine resources are essential to human well-being and social and economic development worldwide. Their conservation and sustainable use are central to achieving the 2030 Agenda, especially for small island developing States. Marine resources are particularly important for people living in coastal communities, who represented 37 per cent of the world population in 2010. Oceans provide livelihoods, subsistence and benefits from fisheries, tourism and other sectors. They also help regulate the global ecosystem by absorbing heat and carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. However, oceans and coastal areas are extremely vulnerable to environmental degradation, overfishing, climate change and pollution.
  • Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    Preserving diverse forms of life on land requires targeted efforts to protect, restore and promote the conservation and sustainable use of terrestrial and other ecosystems. Goal 15 focuses specifically on managing forests sustainably, halting and reversing land and natural habitat degradation, successfully combating desertification and stopping biodiversity loss. All these efforts combined aim to ensure that the benefits of land-based ecosystems, including sustainable livelihoods, will be enjoyed for generations to come.
  • Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
    Central to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is the need to promote peaceful and inclusive societies based on respect for human rights, the rule of law and transparent, effective and accountable institutions. A number of regions have enjoyed increased and sustained levels of peace and security in recent decades. But many countries still face protracted violence and armed conflict, and far too many people are poorly supported by weak institutions and lack access to justice, information and other fundamental freedoms. Efforts are under way to make national and international institutions more effective, inclusive and transparent. Today, more than half the world has internationally recognized human rights institutions. However, significant challenges remain, including lack of data on various forms of violence against children and other vulnerable groups, access to justice and public access to information.
  • Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development
    Achieving the ambitious targets of the 2030 Agenda requires a revitalized and enhanced global partnership that brings together Governments, civil society, the private sector, the United Nations system and other actors, mobilizing all available resources. Meeting implementation targets, including the raising of necessary funds, is key to realizing the Agenda, as is the full implementation of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda. Increasing support to developing countries, in particular the least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States, is fundamental to equitable progress for all.
  • Leaving no one behind
    In committing to the realization of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Member States recognized that the dignity of the individual is fundamental and that the Agenda’s Goals and targets should be met for all nations and people and for all segments of society. Furthermore, they endeavoured to reach first those who are furthest behind.
  • A note to the reader
  • Regional groupings
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